coronavirus

Coronavirus in DC, Maryland, Virginia: What to Know on Nov. 2

Here's what to know about the coronavirus data, resources and reopenings across the D.C. area

NBCUniversal Media, LLC

As the number of COVID-19 cases in D.C., Maryland and Virginia continues to climb, the region is rolling back on some reopening plans.

D.C. Public Schools has backtracked on its plan to reopen elementary schools to some students on Nov. 9, the chancellor announced Monday. Students will continue at-home learning.

“We have heard feedback from many in our community about #ReopenStrong plans, and we will use this moment to adjust our timeline and staffing plans for reopening,” Chancellor Lewis Ferebee said in a message to families. 

D.C.’s health department added California, New Jersey and Oregon to its high-risk list early Monday, bringing the total to 42 states. ⁠ ⁠

People who make non-essential trips to D.C. from these states are required to self-quarantine for 14 days because of coronavirus levels in those locations.


D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser joined U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi in planting white flags to honor COVID-19 victims at a memorial at the D.C. Armory on Monday.

Muriel Bowser, mayor of Washington, D.C., left, and U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, a Democrat from California, prepare to plant flags to honor those who have died of Covid-19 at a memorial at the D.C. Armory Parade Grounds in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Nov. 2, 2020. Photographer: Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The public memorial, titled "In America, How Could This Happen" was conceptualized by D.C.-area artist Suzanne Brennan Firstenberg and brought to life with the help of dozens of community volunteers.

The installation team and volunteers have planted 230,843 flags on the Armory Parade Grounds as of Monday.

"As of today, the artist and scores of community members will have caught up with the national death rate and, sadly, will be ordering additional flags as the number continues to surge," the team wrote in a press release.


In Fairfax County, a pastor who barely survived COVID-19 spoke with News4’s Derrick Ward about his recovery and the tough road still ahead.

"A lot of people don't realize, you get out of the thick of it, but there are things like brain fog and low endurance and limb pain... that people still have to live with," Pastor Kenny Baldwin said.

A Fairfax County pastor who barely survived COVID-19 spoke with News4's Derrick Ward about his recovery and the tough road still ahead.

President Donald Trump suggested Monday that he will fire Dr. Anthony Fauci after Tuesday’s election, sparking chants of “Fire Fauci” from his supporters at a campaign rally in Florida.

Trump’s comments come after Fauci criticized the White House’s response to the coronavirus, saying the U.S. “could not possibly be positioned more poorly” to stem rising COVID-19 infections in the winter months ahead.


The American Academy of Pediatrics’ child care guidelines were updated Oct. 30 to include congestion, runny nose, vomiting or diarrhea on its COVID-19 symptoms checklist, following questions from The Associated Press.

The symptoms were initially not included in the October update, which the pediatrics' group called an oversight.

Medical experts are acknowledging that the lines are blurry for kids presenting symptoms of COVID-19, the flu or common colds and infections.



What the Data Shows

COVID-19 cases in D.C., Maryland and Virginia are trending upward. 

D.C. announced 122 more cases on Saturday, the highest single-day increase since early June. The rolling seven-day average was 89 cases on Monday, 29 cases higher than a week ago. 

D.C.'s positivity rate surged to 3% on Monday, nearly double the rate from the beginning of October.

Maryland reported a rolling seven-day average of 879 Monday, up from 670 a week ago and the highest count since early August. Maryland's positivity rate is also up to 3.94%, up from 2.93% at the beginning of October.

Virginia's seven-day rolling average is at 1,012 cases – the highest count since mid-August. Virginia's positivity rate is 5.8%, following a steady climb up from 5% at the start of October.

The map below shows the number of coronavirus cases diagnosed per 100,000 residents.

Coronavirus Cases in DC, Maryland and Virginia

COVID-19 cases by population in D.C. and by county in Maryland and Virginia

Source: DC, MD and VA Health Departments
Credit: Anisa Holmes / NBC Washington


Local Coronavirus Headlines


Reopening Tracker


How to Stay Safe

There are ways to lower your risk of catching coronavirus. Here are guidelines from the CDC:

  • Anyone over the age of 2 should wear a mask or face covering. Keep it over your nose and mouth.
  • Wash your hands often. When you do, scrub with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. As a backup, use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid close contact with anyone who lives outside your home. That means staying six feet away from anyone outside your circle, even if you're wearing masks.
  • Always cover coughs and sneezes.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.
Contact Us