Missing Link: New Dinosaur Species Discovery Sheds Light on T. Rex

A newly discovered dinosaur, Timurlengia euotica, sheds some light on Jurassic predators including the T. rex, the Smithsonian revealed Monday.

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Original painting by Todd Marshall
A newly discovered dinosaur, Timurlengia euotica, sheds some light on Jurassic predators including the T. rex, the Smithsonian revealed Monday. PICTURED: Life reconstruction of the new tyrannosaur Timurlengia euotica in its environment 90 million years ago.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Top row: Partial braincase of Timurlengia euotica in tree views (L to R: from the back, from below and from the right side). Bottom row: Composite images of the brain case from CT scanning. Reconstructed brain in dark blue, inner ear in pink, nerves in yellow and blood vessel in red.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Reconstructed skeleton of Timurlengia euotica with discovered fossilized bones highlighted in red.
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Hans Sues, Smithsonian
Hans Sues, head of the Department of Paleobiology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History, excavating a dinosaur fossil in Uzbekistan.
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Igor Danilov
Field camp of the expedition at Dzharakuduk in the Kyzylkum Desert of Uzbekistan. The fossils of Timurlengia euotica were found about midway along the cliffs in the background.
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James Di Loreto, Smithsonian
Hans Sues, head of the Department of Paleobiology at the National Museum of Natural History, holding a cast (right hand) of a T. rex tooth for comparison with an actual tooth of the new dinosaur.
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James Di Loreto, Smithsonian
A fossilized tooth of the new tyrannosaur Timurlengia euotica from the Late Cretaceous Period.
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James Di Loreto, Smithsonian
Hans Sues, head of the Department of Paleobiology at the National Museum of Natural History, holding a cast (right hand) of a T. rex tooth for comparison with an actual tooth of the new dinosaur.
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James Di Loreto, Smithsonian
A fossilized tooth of the new tyrannosaur Timurlengia euotica from the Late Cretaceous Period.
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Proceedings of the National Academy Sciences
Family tree showing the interrelationships of most known species of tyrannosaurs.
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