Local

Third 18th-Century Ship Uncovered at Alexandria Waterfront

Some people say loose lips sink ships, but three ancient ships discovered at a construction site along Old Town Alexandria's waterfront were purposefully buried there to expand the land during the 18th century.

16 photos
1/16
2/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
A worker can be seen spraying water on the ship's remains to keep it wet while it's on display for the public. Archaeologists say the ships have to be covered and kept wet in order to preserve the wood.
3/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
This ship is the latest of three ship discoveries and experts believe it could be as long as 50 feet. The ship's hull is what is visible through the construction fence.
4/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
Dozens of residents and visitors came to see the site on Saturday, April 14. Archaeologists were there to explain their discoveries and how the waterfront has changed since the 1700s.
5/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
6/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
7/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
Maritime archaeologists said that after taking hundreds of photos of the ships, they will take them apart bit by bit and piece them back together at another location to preserve them. The ships will be submerged in water so that they don't decompose.
8/16
In the distance, between the largest ship's hull and the construction equipment, you can see gray stones once laid for a foundation. Underneath those stones sits another ship, archaeologists said.
9/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
It's unknown at this time if Alexandria will keep the artifacts and historians encouraged people Saturday to tell their city leaders if they want the ships to stay and be displayed somewhere in the city.
10/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
A local historian speaks to visitors about the discoveries at the Robinson Landing construction site.
11/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
12/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
13/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
14/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
15/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
16/16
Gina Cook/NBC Washington
Contact Us