Scientists Predicting Record Dead Zone in Chesapeake Bay - NBC4 Washington

Scientists Predicting Record Dead Zone in Chesapeake Bay

The dead zones are especially harmful to key Maryland exports like crabs and oysters

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    5 Ways to Make the City Your Gym
    Mark Wilson/Getty Images
    In this Aug. 3, 2006, file photo, a Blue Heron walks along the rocks as the early morning sun is reflected over the Chesapeake Bay in North Beach, Maryland.

    Some ecologists at the University of Maryland are worried that a large spot of low oxygen in the Chesapeake Bay could harm the state's seafood industry.

    News outlets report environmental scientists from Maryland and University of Michigan say they're predicting a 2-mile swath of low-to-no oxygen in the bay, making it one of the largest so-called "dead zones'' in nearly 20 years.

    This particularly damaging dead zone is thought to be caused by heavy rains the region experienced this year, which washed wastewater and agricultural runoff into the bay. The wastewater then produces oxygen-stealing algae.

    The dead zones are especially harmful to key Maryland exports like crabs and oysters, even though other scientists say some smaller marine creatures can withstand the oxygen void.

    Watch NBC4 and get the latest news anytime, anywhere. Check here for TV listings.