Blind Behind the Wheel

Virginia Tech researchers come up with a prototype allowing a blind person to drive independently.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    PhotoAlto/Sigrid Olsson

    Could a blind person get behind the wheel and drive? A team from Virginia Tech plans to demonstrate what would seem like the impossible.

    Researchers are coming up with a prototype vehicle with nonvisual technology that helps a blind person drive independently.
    DriveGrip uses gloves with motors that vibrate over the knuckles to signal when and where a driver should turn.
     
    A tablet about half the size of a sheet of paper would send out compressed through air holes much like those used in air hockey games. That device would inform the driver of his surroundings by creating a map of objects around the car.
     
    A modified Ford Escape SUV will be demonstrated next January at the Daytona International Speedway before a race.