New Cuteness: Cheetah Cubs

Cheetah cubs... is there any way they can't be cute?

9 photos
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Lisa Ware, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
This cheetah cub shows no fear, as an identification transponder is placed beneath the skin by Dr. Margarita Woc-Colburn, an associate veterinarian at the zoo. The cubs are each four-to-five pounds and are reportedly "growing quickly."
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Lisa Ware, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
These five cheetah cubs are just as healthy as they are cute. The six week-old cubs, born on May 28 at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, were given their first check up on July 12. Tell Amani (Mama Cheetah) not to worry, each cub was deemed healthy and vaccinated "against respiratory and gastrointestinal viruses...[that] commonly affect cheetahs."
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Adrienne Crosier, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
Oh hai lil' cheetah!
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Adrienne Crosier, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
Staff at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute in Front Royal, Va., had the opportunity to weigh and inspect five cheetah cubs this week for the first time. These precious babes were born May 28, 2011.
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Adrienne Crosier, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
The staff said the cubs appeared to be healthy, doing well and are very active. The cubs weigh on average about 2 pounds. At least a pound of that is pure cuteness.
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Adrienne Crosier, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
Keepers will continue to monitor the newborns while giving the mother, 6-year-old Amani, privacy to bond with them. Who wouldn't want to bond with that face?
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Adrienne Crosier, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
“When I was weighing the last cub, he was being a very tough little guy,” cheetah biologist Adrienne Crosier said. “We’re already starting to see differences in their dispositions and look forward to watching them grow and learning all we can from them.”
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Adrienne Crosier, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
The Zoo said cheetahs, the fastest animals on land, are struggling to outpace threats to their survival in the wild. Because of human conflict, hunting and habitat loss, there are only an estimated 7,500 to 10,000 cheetahs left in the wild.
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Adrienne Crosier, Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
The International Union for Conservation of Nature considers cheetahs a vulnerable species. We consider them to be adorable.
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