Everything to Know for Pride Month in the DC Area: Resources, Events, LGBTQ+ Stories

Pride Month is June, but you can celebrate and support the LGBTQ+ community all year long

June is Pride Month, the peak time to celebrate the LGBTQ+ community. Here's your guide to Pride Month in the D.C. area, including why it's celebrated and how to be an ally.

Why is Pride Month marked in June?

It commemorates the anniversary of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising.

The pride parades through cities across the United States pay homage to the six-day protest against police harassment and discrimination against the New York LGBTQ+ community.

New York City’s Stonewall Inn was the site of a six day protest in 1969 against police harassment and discrimination against the LGBTQ community. It is remembered today as being a turning-point in the movement for acceptance and equality.

It all started on June 28, 1969. New York police raided The Stonewall Inn LGBTQ+ club, arresting 13 patrons and staff. That sparked a six-night rebellion.

The Stonewall Uprising occurred in a time when being openly LGBTQ+ could get you arrested. Now, the bar a National Historic Landmark.

What does LGBTQ+ stand for?

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (or sometimes questioning). The plus is a reminder that an acronym can't fully explain the myriad ways someone may identify themselves. The Human Rights Campaign has a glossary of terms that may be helpful.

What's the progressive pride flag?

The Progress flag by designer Daniel Quasar is an updated take on the Pride flag and includes light blue, light pink and white stripes to honor transgender people and black and brown stripes to honor marginalized Black and brown communities and people with AIDS, a 2018 fundraiser for the flag explained

The progressive pride flag has the rainbow colors celebrating the full spectrum of love, plus stripes to honor transgender people and marginalized Black and brown communities (Shutterstock).

Pride Month Parade, Events in DC Area

Paint the Town Colorful with Pride
Throughout June

Capital Pride is encouraging everyone in D.C., Maryland and Virginia to go big and colorful with decorations.

If you decorate your home for Pride Month, tag @nbcwashington on Instagram or email isee@nbcwashington.com for a chance to be featured.

Colorful Pridemobile Parade
Saturday, June 12, 2021, 3-6 p.m.
Neighborhoods TBA

A colorful caravan will roll through select D.C. neighborhoods to celebrate LGBTQ pride. Here's the route map and full details.

Go here to see our full guide of LGBTQ+ Pride Month events in D.C., Maryland and Virginia

file photos of DC pride celebrations
Getty/Shutterstock
Capital Pride will be celebrated June 1-30, 2021, in Washington, D.C.

LGBTQ+ Stories

Read more for Pride Month:

A marcher has their fingernails painted in the pink and blue transgender community colors.

Resources and Ways to Support LGBTQ Pride Month in DC

Capital Pride keeps a list of resources for LGBTQ youth. There, you can find help for housing, AIDS protection, plus organizations that empower young people.

The Human Rights Campaign keeps a list of resources for many groups, including a listing of where employers stand in the LGBTQ equality movement and a database of scholarships. Here's more information.

Casa Ruby serves the D.C.-area LGBTQ community, especially folks who are transgender, with food, shelter, job support, health care and more. You can donate to their mission here.

If you have thoughts of suicide, feel overwhelmed or just need a safe and judgment-free place to talk, contact the Trevor Project hotline at 1-866-488-7386. You can also text START to 678-678.

How to Be an LGBTQ+ Ally

"An ally is an individual who speaks out and stands up for a person or group that is targeted and discriminated against," says GLSEN, a group that seeks to support and create safe spaces for LGBTQ+ youth.

Being an ally starts with listening, being open-minded and being willing to talk, GLAAD says.

Stand up to anti-LGBTQ+ comments if you hear them. This guide for teachers has succinct phrases anyone can use.

The Human Rights Campaign has a guide to being an LGBTQ+ ally, and so does GLAAD.

News4's Aimee Cho reports on groups coming together to provide safe spaces for members of the LGBTQ community.

Interest and Identity Specific LGBTQ+ Groups

You Local Pride Celebration

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