The Night Note: 10/15/09

News you need to know.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The following stories are brought to you by the fine folks on the News4 assignment desk.

    SOMEHOW I DON'T THINK THIS'LL FLY
    Because traffic in the D.C. region never seems to improve, transportation experts are about to ask a highly controversial question: Should drivers pay for a road they now ride for free, if it means a better commute?

    The region's Transportation Planning Board -- which examines and approves major transportation projects -- is going to take up the topic during its monthly meeting next week.
    (WTOP)

    DC SUES TO END "MEN'S PARTIES"
    Yesterday, the District of Columbia filed suit against “Men’s Parties,” the underground male sex club located at 1618 14th Street NW. The club has operated for decades in Logan Circle—through fire, allegations of unsafe sexual conditions, and most recently, a member’s death from an accidental head injury inside the club.

    According to Erica Stanley, deputy communications director in the Mayor’s Office, “The District of Columbia believes that the activities occurring at the property located at 1618 14th Street, NW violate the laws of the District of Columbia in that an illegal business entity is operating at the premises. The District has filed a lawsuit to enjoin the business from continuing to operate.” (Washington City Paper)

    SMALLEST MAN EVER?
    A 22 inch-tall Nepali teenager who laid claim to the title of world’s smallest man when he came of age this week says he is looking forward to global fame, international travel - and an arranged marriage with a bride of similar stature.

    When Khagendra Thapa Magar, who weighs just 10lbs, turned 18 yesterday he submitted an application to the Guinness Book of World Records, hoping to realise his ambition of being recognised as the planet’s shortest man, a title currently held by He Pingping of China, who is 28.7 inches tall.  (The Times)

    ART DETECTIVES FINGER DA VINCI IN PAINTING
    Art experts believe they have identified a new Leonardo da Vinci— in part by examining a fingerprint on the canvas.

    Peter Paul Biro, a Montreal-based forensic art expert, said Tuesday that a fingerprint on what was presumed to be a 19th-century German painting of a young woman has convinced art experts that it's actually a da Vinci. (USA Today)