Local Leads: 12/2/10

News you need to know

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    The following stories have been hand-selected by the Assignment Desk at News4:

    SLIPPER-WEARING BANDIT
    Fredericksburg.com "A woman wearing house slippers robbed a Spotsylvania County bank yesterday afternoon, police said. Sheriff's Lt. Col. Michael Timm said the Virginia Commerce Bank at 10800 Courthouse Road was robbed about 3:50 p.m. Details of the robbery were unclear last night, but Timm said no weapon was displayed. The robber got an undisclosed amount of money. The suspect was described as a white woman with blond hair." 

    BYOB
    Gazette: "Wine enthusiasts might be able to bring a bottle of their favorite Bordeaux to their neighborhood bistro if BYOB legislation makes it to the state legislature this spring. The proposal by Del. Brian Feldman (D-Dist. 15) is modeled after a similar law in Washington, D.C., that Feldman says is stealing customers from Montgomery County restaurants. The BYOB proposal is one of several changes lawmakers are seeking to county liquor laws, among the most stringent in the country." 

    "THOUGHT IT WAS A CPR MANEQUIN"
    Insidenova.com: "A Woodbridge woman was sentenced to pay $1,500 in fines Wednesday for her role in a crash that ended in the death of a 39-year-old man. Ellen Yach, 41, pleaded no contest in September to misdemeanor charges of hit-and-run and reckless driving for the February collision. In addition to the fines, Prince William Circuit Court Judge William Hamblen also sentenced Yach to 90 days in jail, with all jail time suspended." 

    DR. SHINE BUSTED
    wtop.com: " A Charles County minister, known as Dr. Shine, has been indicted in a scheme that alleges he tried to hide millions in assets, including a $1.75 million home on the Potomac River, from the federal government.  According to the five-count indictment, Robert J. Freeman, 54, of Indian Head allegedly used church funds to accumulate assets he then concealed from the bankruptcy court when he sought a discharge of his debts in 2005, according to a news release from the U.S. Justice Department. "