Hyde-Smith Beats Espy in US Senate Runoff in Mississippi After Divisive Campaign - NBC4 Washington
Decision 2018

Decision 2018

The latest news on local, state and national midterm elections

Hyde-Smith Beats Espy in US Senate Runoff in Mississippi After Divisive Campaign

Mississippi's past of racist violence became a theme in the election

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Top 4 Reasons to Go to ZooLights
    Rogelio V. Solis/AP
    Republican U.S. Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith calls on her family members to identify themselves as she celebrates her runoff win over Democrat Mike Espy in Jackson, Miss., Tuesday, Nov. 27, 2018. Hyde-Smith will now serve the final two years of retired Republican Sen. Thad Cochran's six year term.

    Republican U.S. Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith won a divisive Mississippi runoff Tuesday, surviving a video-recorded remark decried as racist and defeating a former federal official who hoped to become the state's first African-American senator since Reconstruction.

    The runoff was rocked by the video, in which Hyde-Smith said of a supporter, "If he invited me to a public hanging, I'd be on the front row." A separate video showed her talking about "liberal folks" and making it "just a little more difficult" for them to vote.

    The comments by Hyde-Smith, who is white, made Mississippi's history of racist lynchings a theme of the runoff and spurred many black voters to return to the polls Tuesday.

    In the aftermath of the video, Republicans worried they could face a repeat of last year's special election in Alabama, in which a flawed Republican candidate handed Democrats a reliable GOP Senate seat in the Deep South. The GOP pumped resources into Mississippi, and President Donald Trump made a strong effort on behalf of Hyde-Smith, holding last-minute rallies in Mississippi on Monday.

    Full Version: Trump Argues With Schumer, Pelosi in Public

    [NATL] Full Version: Trump Argues With Schumer, Pelosi in Public

    President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence met with Democratic Senate and House leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi in the White House. Their discussion grew contentious over Trump’s demand for funding his proposed border wall.

    (Published Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018)

    Speaking to supporters after her win, Hyde-Smith vowed to fight for everyone in the state when she goes to Washington.

    "I want everybody to know, no matter who you voted for today, I'm going to always represent every Mississippian. I will work very hard and do my very best to make Mississippi very proud," she said.

    Her supporters said the furor over her comments was overblown. They also stuck by her as a photo was circulated of her wearing a replica Confederate military hat during a 2014 visit to Beauvoir, the last home of Confederate president Jefferson Davis.

    "So many things are taken out of context," said Elizabeth Gallinghouse, 84, from Diamondhead, Mississippi. "The fact that she toured Jefferson Davis's house. You or I could have done the same thing. They said, 'Put this cap on. Hold this gun.' It was a fun time. She wasn't trying to send any messages."

    The contest caps a campaign season that exposed persistent racial divisions in America — and the willingness of some political candidates to exploit them to win elections. With Hyde-Smith's victory, Republicans control 53 of the Senate's 100 seats. The GOP lost control of the House, where Democrats will assume the majority in January.

    In the final weeks of the runoff, Hyde-Smith's campaign said the remark about making voting difficult was a joke. She said the "public hanging" comment was "an exaggerated expression of regard" for a fellow cattle rancher. During a televised debate nine days after the video was publicized, she apologized to "anyone that was offended by my comments," but also said the remark was used as a "weapon" against her.

    Trump: Payments Made Were 'A Simple Private Transaction'

    [NATL] Trump Pushes Back on Cohen Charges, Calls Payment 'Simple Private Transaction'

    President Trump is denying he told one time personal attorney and fixer Michael Cohen to pay hush money to two women who said they had affairs with Mr. Trump. The president called the payments "a simple private transaction", not a violation of campaign finance laws, which Cohen is going to jail for.

    (Published Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018)

    Democratic opponent Mike Espy, 64, a former U.S. agriculture secretary, replied: "I don't know what's in your heart, but I know what came out of your mouth."

    Addressing his supporters Tuesday night, Espy said: "While this is not the result we were hoping for, I am proud of the historic campaign we ran and grateful for the support we received across Mississippi. We built the largest grassroots organization our state has seen in a generation."

    The "public hanging" comment also resonated with his supporters. "That really offended me," said Charles Connley, 60, a black voter from Picayune.

    Some corporate donors, including Walmart, requested refunds on their campaign contributions to Hyde-Smith after the videos surfaced.

    Hyde-Smith was in her second term as Mississippi agriculture commissioner when Republican Gov. Phil Bryant appointed her to temporarily succeed GOP Sen. Thad Cochran. The longtime lawmaker retired in April amid health concerns.

    The win makes Hyde-Smith, 59, the first woman elected to Congress from Mississippi.

    'Late Night’: A Closer Look at John Kelly Departure

    [NATL] 'Late Night’: A Closer Look at John Kelly Departure

    Seth Meyers takes a closer look at the Justice Department effectively calling the President of the United States a criminal and President Donald Trump announcing the departure of his chief of staff.

    (Published Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018)

    Hyde-Smith and Espy emerged from a field of four candidates Nov. 6 to advance to Tuesday's runoff. Her win allows her to complete the final two years of Cochran's six-year term.

    Shortly after the win Tuesday, Trump tweeted: "Congratulations to Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith on your big WIN in the Great State of Mississippi. We are all very proud of you!"

    Associated Press writers Jeff Amy and Janet McConnaughey contributed to this report.