Who's Who: JFK's Assassination

Nov. 22, 1963, remains a day of infamy for many Americans. It is the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, at 12:30 CT while on a trip to help ease tensions in the Democratic Party.

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AP
Born into a prominent political family, John F. Kennedy was the 35th President of the United States, serving from 1961 until his death in 1963. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas Nov. 22, 1963 at 12:30 p.m. CT. He was riding with his motorcade through Downtown Dallas when he was fatally shot by a sniper. He was shot three times in the throat, back and head. The final shot to the head proved to be fatal. Kennedy was taken to the hospital for treatment but was pronounced dead at 1:00 p.m. CT. He is best known for his handling of the Cuban Missile Crisis and providing funding to NASA to promote space exploration at the height of the "Space Race."
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Jackie Kennedy was the wife of John F. Kennedy and First Lady of the United States from 1961 until John F. Kennedy's death in 1963. She was known for renovating many rooms in the White House. Kennedy was with John when he was fatally shot in Dallas Nov. 22, 1963, and refused to take off her blood-soaked clothes well after Kennedy was pronounced dead. Kennedy wore her pink blouse on the way back to Washington aboard Air Force One while standing next to Lyndon B. Johnson as he took the oath of office.
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Associated Press
Dr. Malcolm Oliver Perry II was the attending doctor to President Kennedy at Parkland Memorial Hospital after he was shot in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. Dr. Perry performed a tracheotomy in an unsuccessful attempt to revive President Kennedy. Perry was also the attending doctor for shooting suspect Lee Harvey Oswald, who was shot Nov. 24, 1963 by Jack Ruby.
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Associated Press
Policeman J.D. Tippit was slain during the search for President Kennedy's assassin. Pictured center is Marie Tippit, the widow of Tippit, at the Beckley Hills Baptist Church in Dallas, Nov. 25, 1963 after funeral services for her husband. Tippit was an 11-year veteran of the Dallas Police Department.
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In this April 10, 1963 file photo, American flags flown upside down and an anti-U.N. sign are shown at the Dallas home of Army Maj. Gen. Edwin Walker, an ultra-conservative who resigned after being reprimanded by President John F. Kennedy. Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly fired two shots at Walker's home on April 10, 1963, nearly killing him.
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Lee Harvey Oswald was arrested hours after President Kennedy had been shot in connection with the assassination of President Kennedy Nov. 22, 1963. Oswald denied any involvement in the shootings, but never actually stood trial. Two days after the Kennedy assassination, Oswald was fatally shot by Jack Ruby.
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Jack Ruby was a Dallas nightclub operator who shot and killed Lee Harvey Oswald Nov. 24, 1963 as he was being transferred from Dallas Police Headquarters to county jail. A jury found Ruby guilty for murder and sentenced him to death. Ruby appealed his conviction and death sentence and while awaiting for a new trial date, fell ill and died of lung cancer.
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President Lyndon B. Johnson meets with Judge Sarah T. Hughes of Dallas, Tex., in his White House office, Feb. 1, 1964. Judge Hughes administered the oath as President to Johnson aboard Air Force One after John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.
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Sen. Richard Russell (D-Ga.), was a member of the Warren Commission investigating the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. President Johnson created the Warren Commission to investigate the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The Warren Commission concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in assassinating President Kennedy Nov. 22, 1963, and that Jack Ruby also acted alone when he shot and killed Oswald two days later. The findings were very controversial and have been challenged by later studies.
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Associated Press
Chief Justice Earl Warren was chairman of the Warren Commission, and oversaw the investigation into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. He is most notable for his landmark decisions in Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which made the segregation of public schools illegal, and Miranda v. Arizona (1966), which established the "Miranda rights" for suspects taken into police custody.
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AP
President Lyndon B. Johnson speaks at a news conference at the White House in Washington, Feb. 1, 1964. Johnson took over the Presidency after Kennedy was assassinated Nov. 22, 1963, and won re-election in 1964 over Republican nominee Barry Goldwater. He is best known for pushing the "Great Society" legislation, including laws that upheld civil rights, broadcasting rights, Medicare and Medicaid. Johnson is also known for escalating American involvement in the Vietnam War.
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New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison is shown at his desk Feb. 19, 1967. Garrison initially opened an investigation into the assassination in 1966 after receiving tips from private investigator Jack Martin about another person's possible involvement in the assassination. Garrison later claimed his investigation had proven that the Warren Commission was wrong in its conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in assassinating President Kennedy. Garrison's investigation eventually led to the prosecution of businessman Clay Shaw.
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New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison, left, and businessman Clay Shaw pass briefly outside federal court in New Orleans, Jan. 26, 1971, where Shaw was seeking to block Garrison's perjury case against him. Shaw was tried and later acquitted of charges filed by Garrison that he conspired to kill President Kennedy. Two days later, Garrison charged Shaw with perjury.
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Associated Press
Zapruder was a manufacturer most notably known for inadvertently filming the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Zapruder later turned over the footage to the Secret Service's Dallas office. Pictured is Alan Lewis, a National Archives preservation specialist, holding what is believed to be Abraham Zapruder's original movie of President Kennedy's assassination at the Archives storage facility in College Park, Md. July 7, 1998. The film is kept at the National Archives in a 25-degree room alongside color footage of man landing on the moon and home movies taken by Adolf Hitler's mistress.
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