60th Anniversary of Emmett Till’s Lynching

Sixty years ago, Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black boy from Chicago visiting family in Mississippi, was murdered for allegedly "wolf-calling" the wife of a white man. Roy Bryant and his half-brother were found not guilty; they later confessed to the killing in a 1956 Look magazine article. Till's death was a catalyst for the civil rights movement. Click through to see images from the trial.

17 photos
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Jurors sit in a courtroom in Summer, Miss. for the trial of Roy Bryant and J.W. Milam, charged with the murder Emmett Till and acquitted by the all-white jury. The two confessed to the killing in a 1956 Look magazine article.
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Carolyn Bryant rests her head on her husband Roy Bryant's shoulder after she testified in the murder trial in Sumner, Miss., Sept. 22. 1955.
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Emmett L.Till, 14 years old and from Chicago. His battered body, a bullet in his head, and a weight around his neck were pulled from the Tallahatchie River in Mississippi. The murder trial in Sumner Miss., opened on Sept. 19, 1955 . Emmett is alleged to have "wolf-whistled" and made advances at Bryant's wife Carolyn.
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A cotton-gin fan is presented as evidence in the trial investigating the death Emmett Till, in Sumner, Miss., on September 22, 1955. The fan had been tied around the boy's neck with barbed wire when his body was found in the Tallahatchie River near the Delta community of Money, Mississippi, on August 31, 1955.
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John W. Milam, 35, left, his half-brother Roy Bryant, 24, and Bryant's wife Carolyn. The brothers were charged with the murder of Emmett Till.
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Mamie Bradley, Emmett Till's mother, receives a subpoena in a courtroom in Tallahatchie, Miss. to appear as a witness in the trial, Sept. 20, 1955.
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Mose Wright, right, and his son Simeon, sit in their home at the community of Money, Miss., near Greenwood, and discuss the loss of Emmett Till, September 1, 1955.
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Roy Bryant, right, and his half-brother, J. W. Milam, second from right, walk down the steps of the Leflore County Courthouse in Greenwood, Miss. after being freed on bond, charged in the kidnapping and murder of Emmett Till, Sept. 30, 1955.
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Mrs. Mamie Bradley, mother of Emmett Louis Till, attends a rally in Williams Institutional Christian Methodist Episcopal Church at Seventh Avenue in New York, September 25, 1955. Mrs. Bradley told the rally that the acquittal of the two men accused of the murder of her son constituted a signal that lynching is now in order.
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Rep. Charles Diggs, center, addresses a rally of about 6,000 people in Detroit, Michigan, Sept. 25, 1955. The rally was called in protest against the not-guilty verdict acquitting two white Mississippi men in the slaying of 14-year-old black Emmett Till, of Chicago. Till was killed while visiting relatives in Money, Mississippi.
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Officers stands by as black religious leaders from Chicago demonstrate outside the White House in Washington against the murder of 14-year-old Chicagoan boy Emmett Louis Till, on October 24, 1955.
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John W. Milam, 36, left, watches as a barber lathers the face of Roy Bryant, 24, center, in Sumner, Miss., Sept. 6, 1955. The shave came just before the half-brothers were arraigned on charges they kidnapped and murdered Emmett Till.
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Roy Bryant with his family in the office of his attorney, Sept. 19, 1955 in Sumner, Mississippi. Carolyn Bryant holds son Lamar, 2, and Bryant holds Roy, Jr., 4.
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Circuit Court Judge Curtis Swango Jr., from Sardis, Miss., seen in this September 6, 1955 photo, was the judge in the trial of half-brothers J.W. Milam and Roy Bryant, accused of murdering 14-year-old Chicagoan boy Emmett Louis Till.
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J.W. Milam and his wife Juanita are all smiles after hearing the "not guilty" verdict in Sumner, Miss., Sept. 22, 1955.
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Roy Bryant seen after he was found "not guilty" of the killing of Emmett Till, Sumner, Miss., Sept. 22, 1955.
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