Pompeo Skips Visit to Greenland Amid New Tensions With Iran - NBC4 Washington
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Pompeo Skips Visit to Greenland Amid New Tensions With Iran

The Greenland stop was the second trip Pompeo cancelled on what was supposed to be a four-nation tour of Europe

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    Pompeo Skips Visit to Greenland Amid New Tensions With Iran
    Mandel Ngan/AP
    US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, right, speaks at a joint press conference with Britain's Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt at the Foreign Office in central London, Wednesday May 8, 2019.

    U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has cancelled a visit to Greenland to return to Washington amid an escalation of tensions with Iran.

    Pompeo had been due to wrap up a trip to Europe on Thursday with a stop in Greenland aimed at promoting the Trump administration's Arctic policies. Those policies were criticized earlier this week for not containing the words "climate change" when Pompeo attended an Arctic Council meeting in Finland.

    The State Department says that Pompeo will still order a restoration of a permanent U.S. diplomatic presence in Greenland.

    The Greenland stop was the second trip Pompeo cancelled on what was supposed to be a four-nation tour of Europe. On Tuesday, he abruptly dropped a trip to Germany to fly to Baghdad for meetings with Iraqi leaders.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)