Maryland

‘It Was Unstoppable': Prince George's Woman Rescued From 5 Feet of Floodwaters Inside Apartment

Two months-worth of rain fell in parts of Prince George's County, Maryland, Wednesday night, Storm Team4 said

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A Greenbelt, Maryland, woman had a terrifying experience Wednesday when flash floodwaters tore into her apartment, trapping her inside as water rose as high as 5 feet.

The woman, who did not want to be named, said water quickly poured into her lower level apartment unit when the storms hit.

"I jumped up and I ran to the living room and that’s when I saw water rushing in from both sides of the door and it was unstoppable at that point," she said.

Two months-worth of rain fell in parts of Prince George's County Wednesday night, Storm Team4 said.

"I managed to get the bed up into the living room on top of the couch and the water came in so quickly it started coming in through the windows, as well. And as the water rushed up, I hopped on the bed and the bed was floating on the water. Eventually, the wall started coming in," the woman told News4.

Parts of Rhode Island Avenue were flooded for the third time. News4's Jackie Bensen reports on the aftermath.

She said the water rose to 5 feet inside, and rescue crews couldn't open the door because of the pressure.

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"They had to break the bedroom window completely, and sent life jackets in for us and carried me out," she said.

Nearby, in Edmonston, Bill Frunk’s basement flooded again. He said it was the third time in six weeks.

"It’s depressing. Real depressing, 'cause there appears to be no real solution," Frunk said.

Edmonston has had ongoing issues with flooding. There’s a county pumping station just blocks away on the northeast branch of the Anacostia River, but it hasn’t stopped the water from flooding streets and homes.

"But it’s just so much rain that comes down that it’s just not doing the trick. So what happens is there is an overflow and it tends to just go into our residents' homes. It floods our streets, cars," Edmonston Mayor Tracy Gant said.

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