Lyon Sisters: Police Name Second Person of Interest in Girls' Disappearance - NBC4 Washington

Lyon Sisters: Police Name Second Person of Interest in Girls' Disappearance

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Second Suspect Named in Lyon Sisters' Disappearance

    News4's Jackie Bensen on the latest details surrounding the investigation into the disappearance of two Maryland sisters. (Published Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014)

    Police have named a second person of interest in the disappearance of two young Maryland sisters decades ago and said there's a good chance their bodies are buried in a remote area of Virginia.

    The Lyon sisters -- Sheila, 12, and Katherine, 10 -- vanished March 25, 1975, after visiting a Wheaton shopping center.

    Montgomery County, Maryland, authorities have been searching a property located in Bedford County, Virginia, between Lynchburg and Roanoke since last week. It was once owned by the family of 57-year-old Lloyd Lee Welch Jr., who is also known as Michael Welch. He was named a person of interest in February.

    His uncle Richard Allen Welch Sr. of Hyattsville, Maryland, was named a person of interest Thursday afternoon. He worked as a security guard in the 1970s, and police believe he owned and may still own the property being searched.

    New Developments in Lyon Sister Cold Case

    [DC] New Developments in Lyon Sister Cold Case
    Almost four decades after Sheila and Katherine Lyon vanished from Wheaton, Maryland, police announced major developments, including a second person of interest. The News4 I-Team's Tisha Thompson reports.
    (Published Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014)

    Half a dozen people have come forward and talked to police since Lloyd Welch was named, News4 learned. Each told similar stories of being approached at the Wheaton Plaza shopping center by a man with a badge accusing them of stealing something and attempting to grab them and lead them to a parking area.

    Investigators believe all of those who came forward were teenagers when they were approached, and at least one of the reports happened two years after the Lyon sisters disappeared, said sources close to the investigation. Investigators are looking at that pattern of behavior.

    Police want anyone who had a business in the area of Wheaton Plaza in the mid-1970s to check their records to see if they employed a security guard named Richard Welch.

    At his Hyattsville homeThursday evening, a woman refused to answer questions, but neighbors told News4's Jackie Bensen police were at the house for several hours Sept. 19.

    Police Searching Property Once Owned by Family of Person of Interest

    [DC] Police Searching Property Once Owned by Family of Person of Interest
    Detectives have been searching a Virginia property for the past week in connection with the infamous disappearance of two young Maryland sisters decades ago. News4's Shomari Stone reports.
    (Published Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014)

    A grand jury will be called in Bedford County on Friday.

    Police have zeroed in on Taylor Mountain, where they are looking to recover evidence "that will hold those that harmed those girls responsible in a court of law." They believe the Lyon sisters are on the mountain.

    Detectives have not found any remains, sources said, though neighbors in the area think police are searching for remains at a nearby cemetery. 

    The Bedford County Sheriff's Office confirmed that officers were assisting Montgomery County Police "with a homicide investigation."

    They've said they're "very confident" they're close to finding out exactly what happened to the sisters.

    The Bedford County Sheriff's Office also said cold case investigators had traveled to the area last week to meet with Bedford County authorities and Virginia State Police.

    Lyon Sisters: Police Searching Property Once Owned by Family of Person of Interest

    [DC] Lyon Sisters: Police Searching Property Once Owned by Family of Person of Interest
    Detectives have been searching a Virginia property for the past week in connection with the infamous disappearance of two young Maryland sisters decades ago. News4's Shomari Stone reports.
    (Published Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014)

    The Lyon sisters' case is etched into the memories of several generations of Washington-area families. It shattered a sense of safety in the D.C. suburbs and made parents afraid to let their children out of their sight.

    On March 25, 1975, the Lyon sisters had planned a day at a local shopping center. They were on spring break, and wanted to get pizza for lunch and see the Easter decorations at Wheaton Plaza, now known as Westfield Wheaton Mall.

    With less than $4, they left their home in Kensington, Maryland, and walked the half-mile or so to Wheaton Plaza.

    There, a friend saw the girls outside the Orange Bowl restaurant with an older man who had a tape recorder and a briefcase, according to news and missing persons reports.

    The girls were later spotted walking home, but by their 4 p.m. curfew, they hadn't arrived. By 7 p.m. that night, police had been called.

    Lyon Sisters: Police to Search Property Once Owned by Family of Person of Interest

    [DC] Lyon Sisters: Police to Search Property Once Owned by Family of Person of Interest
    Montgomery County detectives will search a Virginia property in connection with the infamous disappearance of two young sisters 39 years ago, sources say. News4's Scott MacFarlane reports.
    (Published Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2014)

    Later, a composite sketch was distributed of the man who seen talking to them. Tips flowed in, but to no avail.

    Sheila and Katherine were never seen again.

    Lyon Sisters' Disappearance Rocked Montgomery County

    [DC] Lyon Sisters' Disappearance Rocked Montgomery County
    News4's Jim Vance explains how the 1975 disappearance of two young girls rocked a tight-knit community and changed things for years.
    (Published Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014)

    In February, police identified a person of interest in connection with their disappearance. Lloyd Lee Welch Jr. is a convicted sex offender who has been in prison in Delaware since 1997 on a rape conviction. Welch was noticed paying attention to the sisters the afternoon they vanished, investigators said.

    "Even though so much time has passed, we have not forgotten that those young girls deserve justice, and their family deserves closure," said Montgomery County Police Chief Thomas Manger in February.

    Lloyd+Lee+Welch+Jr.

    Retired Detective Recalls Frustrating Lyon Sisters Investigation

    [DC] Retired Detective Recalls Frustrating Lyon Sisters Investigation
    Almost 40 years after two Maryland sisters vanished, there could be a major break in the case. News4's Chris Gordon has reaction from one of the first detectives to work on the case.
    (Published Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014)

    Welch is originally from the D.C. area. Between the 1970s and the mid-1990s, he traveled extensively through the United States while working for a carnival company with his girlfriend Helen Craver, police said.

    Welch was charged with raping juveniles in Virginia and South Carolina. He was also arrested in a burglary not far from Wheaton Plaza. He was known to hitchhike throughout the D.C. area.

    Many people who grew up in the area remember the disappearance of the sisters, and how deeply it shook their sense of safety.

    Break in Decades-Old Disappearance of Lyon Sisters: PD

    [DC] Break in Decades-Old Disappearance of Lyon Sisters: PD
    A person of interest has been identified in connection with the 1975 disappearance of two young girls from a Maryland shopping center, a mystery that has haunted the D.C. area for almost four decades.
    (Published Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2014)

    "It was just stunning. It could have been anybody's kids," said Charleen Merkel earlier this year while shopping at Westfield Wheaton.

    "It brings back a lot of memories of being scared growing up," said another shopper, who did not give her name.

    In an era when children frequently walked to school and elsewhere alone, parents started keeping their children inside.

    Break in Decades-Old Disappearance of Md. Sisters

    [DC] Break in Decades-Old Disappearance of Md. Sisters
    A person of interest has been identified in connection with the 1975 disappearance of two young girls from a Maryland shopping center.
    (Published Monday, Feb. 10, 2014)

    "The Community Just Held Its Breath"

    In 2005, 30 years after the girls' disappearance, police spoke about the frustration of never being able to solve a case that struck such an emotional chord for the community and for themselves.

    The Lyon sisters' older brother, Jay, became a police officer.

    Possible Break in Lyon Sisters Cold Case

    [DC] Possible Break in Lyon Sisters Cold Case
    After nearly 40 years of unanswered questions - there could finally be some answers in a case that rocked the Washington region: two young girls who vanished while walking to the mall, never seen or heard from again.
    (Published Monday, Feb. 10, 2014)

    "It's a hit-home case," Philip C. Raum, a longtime law enforcement officer in Montgomery County who headed the police's Major Crimes Unit for four years, told Montgomery County's Gazette newspaper in an article on the 30th anniversary of the disappearance.

    The girls' father, John Lyon was a performer and a popular radio personality on WMAL in Bethesda. 

    Possible Break in Decades-Old Lyons Sisters Cold Case

    [DC] Possible Break in Decades-Old Lyons Sisters Cold Case
    Police have discovered new information that may lead to a possible break in the decades-old, cold-case of the Lyons sisters, who disappeared in Wheaton almost 40 years ago.
    (Published Monday, Feb. 10, 2014)

    Radio personality Chris Core had just started working with him at WMAL when the girls disappeared.

    "It's in that group of moments where the community just held its breath," Core told the Gazette in 2005.

    "Partly because John was a well-known celebrity and partly because here are two innocent little girls going to the mall and disappear off the face of the earth, never to be heard from again."

    Baltimore author Laura Lippman wrote a 2007 novel, "What the Dead Know," after being inspired by the Lyon case.

    "The story... happened when I was a teenager, not much older than the girls who disappeared (the Lyon sisters) and living in a similarly 'safe' suburb," Lippman wrote in a chat on GoodReads.com. "It resonated very deeply with me."

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