World War II Memorial Not a Swimming Pool

You can dip, but don't wade in the water

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
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    WASHINGTON - JULY 06: Brothers Allen Peters (L) and Derek Peters (R) of Shavertown, Pennsylvania, cool themselves off in a fountain at the World War II Memorial during the season's first heat wave July 6, 2010 in Washington, DC. The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory for part of the Northeast, mid-Atlantic and parts of Michigan and Kentucky with temperatures in some areas predicted to reach 100 degrees. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

    The water that serves as the centerpiece of the World War II Memorial on the National Mall can be an inviting site for those looking to beat the heat on these 100-degree days.

    But a word of advice: Feel free to sit on the edge and get your feet and ankles wet, but don't wade in the water.

    National Park Service spokesman Bill Line said it is illegal to walk or wade in the water or to splash others in the Rainbow Pool.

    "It is also considered to be highly disrespectful to World War II veterans, sadly most of whom are no longer with us," Line said. "There should be a high level of respect and decorum displayed at all times at the Memorial."

    What is the consequence if you get caught? A park ranger will likely ask you to stop. But if you continue to show a lack of respect -- and class -- U.S. Park Police may get involved.

    "Each situation is unique, but depending on how the person conducts themselves, officers have discretion and can make an arrest," Line said.

    And don't even think about taking the pooch for a dip in the pool, either. No pets are allowed at the World War II Memorial -- period.

    "The World War II Memorial is not and never has been designed to be a swimming pool," Line said. It is to commemorate and honor the supreme sacrifice that 16 million people made during World War II."

    The rules are similar at the other monuments on the Mall that include water. While the water at the WWII Memorial is filtered, the same can't be said for the Tidal Basin or Reflecting Pool, which is actually water from the Potomac River.