United They Rally in Annapolis

Fans to rally for Prince George's soccer stadium

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    NEWSLETTERS

    ANNAPOLIS, Md.  -- After crashing state servers with a plethora of e-mails, D.C. United fans converged on Annapolis in person Tuesday to support the franchise's plan to move to Prince George's County and build a new stadium ... with public funding, of course.

    Fans rallied in Annapolis before packing hearing rooms to testify before state lawmakers in support of the move.
     

    Fans Rally in Support of DC United Stadium

    [DC] Fans Rally in Support of DC United Stadium
    D.C. United fans march through the streets of Annapolis to the state capitol to demonstrate in favor of a House bill authorizing construction of a soccer stadium in Prince George's County. (Published Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009)

    The official D.C. United Web site urged fans to gather at noon at Annapolis' City Dock to show support for public financing of a Prince George's County stadium.
     

    Soccer Fans March for Prince George's County Stadium

    [DC] Soccer Fans March for Prince George's County Stadium
    D.C. United fans marched in Annapolis to encourage lawmakers to go forth with a plan to put a soccer stadium in Prince George's County. (Published Tuesday, Mar 17, 2009)

    "Earlier this week, Kevin Payne asked for your support in e-mailing and calling state and county lawmakers with messages of support for our stadium proposal in Prince George's County. You responded with a deluge of e-mails that has dwarfed anything Annapolis has ever witnessed. It is truly moving the needle for us and we'll forever appreciate the passion, the creativity and the effort you all continue to display in support of our organization on the field and off.

    "We're again asking for your support next Tuesday in Annapolis. While we know that many of you have work obligations, we're asking our supporters, that are able, to join us at hearings before the House Appropriations Committee and Senate Budget and Taxation Committee."
     

     

    Some legislators say they're skeptical about a bill allowing the Maryland Stadium Authority to sell bonds to build the potentially $195 million venue. They say they're concerned about whether the stadium would garner enough revenue to pay off 75 percent of the bonds.
     

    Team officials have said they would pay 25 percent of the stadium's costs, insisting the rest would come from revenue received at soccer games and other events.