Tornado "Could've Been Worse": Fire Chief

Trees swirled around homes, but refused to destroy most of them

By Asha Beh
|  Saturday, Aug 1, 2009  |  Updated 10:01 AM EDT
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Trees Refused to Destroy Homes: Fire Chief

NBCWashington.com

Several trees were taken out, knocked over, broken at the tops, and uprooted during the storm in Ijamsville, Md., but many houses survived intact.

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Trees Refused to Destroy Homes: Fire Chief

An 1840s farmhouse in Ijamsville, Md. didn't survive Friday's tornado, but many other homes -- and people -- did.
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Those lucky enough have only had to repair part of their roofs today after a tornado hit Frederick County, Md., Friday.

Winds were estimated to be as high as 100 mph sent huge bails of hay crashing into fences and caused many a tree to snap and fall over throughout the region -- especially in the town of Ijamsville, which seems to be the place hardest hit in Friday afternoon's storms. 

No injuries were reported.  But perhaps the storm's greatest casualty, home-wise at least, was a farmhouse built around 1840; it was flattened in seconds.  

According to Ijamsville fire chief Jimmy Loveless, most trees seemed to swirl around people's homes, but refused to destroy them.

"It could've been a lot worse," Loveless said.  "We're thankin' the Lord that this is all it is."

The same storms also caused damage in much of northern and central Maryland, as well as the Eastern Shore, and knocked out power in at least 55,000 homes and business in Maryland and Virginia, The Washington Post reported.

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