Suspected Corker Carjacker Caught in a Dress

Black jacket, black dress, black Tahoe

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    NEWSLETTERS

    TK
    Dewalden Connors and Steven Alston

    One of the men arrested in the carjacking of a senator's daughter was dressed in women's clothes, according to charging documents.

    After 9 p.m. Wednesday, Julia Corker, 22, was driving a black Chevrolet Tahoe owner by her father, Sen. Robert Corker, R-Tenn., when she was carjacked by two men just a couple of blocks from the Verizon Center, not too far from the Capitol. The victim was driving back to the apartment she shares with her father when someone knocked on the window at Seventh and D streets, where she was stopped at a traffic light. When she rolled down the window, she was dragged out of the vehicle.

    Within minutes, the senator, D.C. police and Capitol Police were by the victim's side. Even the FBI got involved.

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    Apparently, the suspects drove to a Taco Bell across the street from a Seat Pleasant, Md., police station, where officers spotted the Tahoe just after 10:30 p.m. The driver, 25-year-old Steven Alston, of Northeast, and the passenger, 22-year-old Dewalden Connors, were taken into custody without incident.

    Well, without too much incident.

    According to charging documents, Connors was wearing a black jacket and a black dress.

    "Are y'all gonna arrest him, too, or are y'all gonna let him go?" Alston reportedly asked police.

    After being informed that both Alston and Connors were under arrest, Alston asked, "Are we gonna be in the same holding cell or are they gonna put him in with the females?"

    The two suspects are awaiting extradition to D.C.

    Julia Corker was knocked out briefly during the carjacking but she should be fine. Sen. Corker said his daughter is sore and shaken up but doing well.

    "It happened just half a block from our apartment in the Penn Quarter area, which is about nine blocks from the Capitol, an area ... perceived to be a very safe and well-traveled area," Sen. Corker said.