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AM Read: What Does The Future Hold For Virginia Democrats?

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AM Read: Va. Democrats Future?

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RICHMOND, VA - AUGUST 14: Virginia Gov. Tim Kaine addresses a fundraising event at the Science Museum of Virginia August 14, 2008 in Richmond, Virginia. Kaine's name has been mentioned as a possible vice presidential candidate for presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL). Obama's campaign is dedicating large resources to Virginia in hopes of turning the traditionally Republican state blue in the fall election. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Virginia—once a bastion of independent voters—has undoubtedly turned more red in recent years. Republicans currently hold the governor’s mansion, the House and Senate, a rare occurrence for a state that, until about the 1960s, was dominated by Democrats.

At the RNC, Bearing Drift, a conservative Virginia Politics blog, spoke with former Lt. Gov. John Hager about Virginia politics, mainly on how the Democrats will survive in Virginia. The Democrat party, he said, used to be more fiscally conservative and elected people like Sen. Jim Webb. Now the Virginia Democrat Party mimics the national party and is represented by people like Tim Kaine, who some say is too liberal to appeal to the moderate voters in the famously purple state.

“Have Virginia Democrats really become indistinguishable from their national cousins?” the interviewer asked.

Yes, Hager answered, adding that the GOP in Virginia has also become intertwined with its national party.

The future of both parties will certainly become more clear in November. But with polls tied up in both the presidential and the senate elections, it seems that Virginia is so far living up to its status as one of the crucial swing states this election year.

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