Metro Program That Will Credit Delayed Riders Starts Friday - NBC4 Washington

Adam Tuss and the News4 team covering everything that slows you down on roads and transit

Metro Program That Will Credit Delayed Riders Starts Friday

Riders will receive an automatic credit on their SmarTrip card if their trip is delayed by 15 minutes or more

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Metro Approves Plan to Refund Customers for Late Trains

    Metro officials approved a plan that will allow rush hour commuters to get an automatic refunds if their train is running late. News4's Adam Tuss reports on this new rule. (Published Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018)

    Starting Friday, you will get some money back into your pocket if your Metro train is late.

    Metro's board approved the Rush Hour Promise program Thursday. 

    The program, which will begin Friday morning, will give riders an automatic credit on their SmarTrip card if their weekday rush-hour trip is delayed by 15 minutes or more.

    The credit can be used for a future trip.

    Metro Approves Program That Will Credit Delayed Riders

    [DC] Metro Approves Program That Will Credit Delayed Riders

    Metro's board has given preliminary approval to a proposal that will credit customers if their train or bus is late.

    (Published Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018)

    But don't celebrate just yet. 

    Weather, traffic delays and scheduled maintenance will not be covered under the program.

    The credit will be automatic for Metrorail customers, but bus riders will have to fill out a form. Customers will also have a cap on the number of credits they could receive in a month. 

    Metro Wants to Credit Your Trip If Your Train Is Delayed

    [DC] Metro Wants to Credit Your Trip If Your Train Is Delayed

    Metro is proposing a change that would put money back into your pocket if your train is late. News4's Adam Tuss has more on the proposal. 

    (Published Monday, Jan. 8, 2018)

    "Rush Hour Promise is our commitment to riders that we are accountable for providing reliable, on-time service," said Metro General Manager Paul J. Wiedefeld. "We want our customers to know that we value their time, and we're going to do everything we can to keep them moving safely and efficiently." 

    Metro says since SafeTrack ended, only .5 percent of rail trips were delayed by 15 minutes or more. That means the transit agency would have to give back about $600,000 for those delayed trips. 

    According to Metro documents, about 9 out of 10 weekday trips on Metrorail arrive on time.