Ehrlich Looks Back to the Future

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    NEWSLETTERS

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    Bob Ehrlich vs. Martin O'Malley

    Former Maryland Gov. Bob Ehrlich is in the running for his old job.

    Ehrlich was Maryland's first Republican governor in a generation, but he was defeated in the last election by Democrat Martin O'Malley.

    The rematch will offer voters sharp contrasts and could attract national attention if it's a close race.

    Gubernatorial Grudge Match: Ehrlich vs O'Malley 2?

    [DC] Gubernatorial Grudge Match: Ehrlich vs O'Malley 2?
    Former Maryland Gov. Bob Ehrlich officially announced he is in the running for his old job.

    Ehrlich calls it History, Part 2. He chose Rockville Town Square to announce he's running for governor against the man who took his job for years ago. He said the media is trying to make this into a grudge match.

    He said the last time he was in a grudge match was in elementary school -- and he won it. He's in this race to win, too. He is attacking his successor's record.

    "No more tech tax. No more wealth tax. Enough," he said. "And today we again look to our small business entrepreneurs as a source of job creation, not revenue enhancement."

    Gifford's Ice Cream store welcomed the Ehrlichs with a new flavor combination in their honor: peppermint and coffee. Ehrlich asked to work behind the counter, scooping ice cream.

    "We welcome the former governor as a supporter of small businesses in the state," said Gifford's owner Luke Cooper.

    Ehrlich credited the former first lady with convincing him to run again.

    "He's not done with public life, and he's needed," Kendel Ehrlich said.

    Ehrlich is hoping to appeal to tea party conservatives, dissatisfied Democrats and independents.

    Derek McCoy, an independent from Prince George's County, said right now he is leaning toward Ehrlich but wants to hear what both candidates have to say.

    In Annapolis, Gov. O'Malley mingled with visitors at the city dock. Miral Dizdar, a Montgomery County voter, posed for a picture with his wife and the governor and said O'Malley has done well enough to deserve to be reelected.

    The governor took about a dozen questions from reporters, pointing out that Ehrlich had declined to answer any reporter questions during his Rockville appearance.

    O'Malley answered Ehrlich's charges and returned fire, saying," We have had to make unpopular short-term decisions, but the size of the state government today is smaller than what it was when he was governor."

    O'Malley challenged Ehrlich to debate what he calls the hard choices that need to be made to move Maryland forward.