The Night Note: 7/21/10

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The following stories are brought to you by the fine folks on the News4 assignment desk.

    ROAD RAGE LEADS TO ARREST
    A Dale City man was arrested early Wednesday after a road rage incident along Smoketown Road.

    It started about 12:25 a.m. in the 14000 block of Smoketown Road when a motorist rammed another driver’s car three times, said Prince William County police spokesman Jonathan Perok.

    The angry driver also flashed what appeared to be a handgun at the 18-year-old victim. (Inside NoVA)

    POLICE INVESTIGATE PEANUT BUTTER PLAYGROUND PRANK
    It may have started as a prank, but local parents are concerned about a nutty situation at a playground.

    The Loudoun County's Sheriff's Department is investigating peanut butter-covered playground equipment at a park in the Broadlands section of Ashburn.

    Swings chains were slathered with Jif, according to neighbors who discovered a lid nearby.  (WTOP)

    BIG TIME CHEFS WANT TO BRING HEALTHY FOOD TO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
    A group of prominent D.C.-area restaurant chefs has volunteered to introduce a novel concept in school food service to one Capitol Hill elementary school:  collaborating with parents to take over kitchen operations on a non-profit basis, replacing prepackaged and reheated factory meals kids currently eat with food cooked from scratch and served with real plates and cutlery.

    Led by Cathal Armstrong, chef and owner of Restaurant Eve in Alexandria, the group would undo the historically knotty issue of school food finances by putting parents to work in the cafeteria as volunteers at Tyler Elementary and using the savings in labor to buy better food, much of it from local growers. The proposal has been approved by D.C. Public School food services, but is still being reviewed by the school system’s procurement division, meaning much paperwork, red tape and potential snags remain between now and August 23, when classes resume. (The Slow Cook ht DCist)

    KENSINGTON'S CIRCLE MANOR WAITS ON MONEY
    Almost daily, Duane Thompson looks out of his Kensington home and sees unrealized potential.

    He is not looking at a possible real estate venture; rather he stares across Carroll Place toward the historic Warner Circle Mansion also called Circle Manor — one of the town's oldest and most-well known properties — and thinks about what it could be.

    "I'd love to see it become something or even anything," Thompson said. "It's a shame it just sits there." (Maryland Gazette)