The Night Note: 10/25/10

News you need to know.

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The following stories are brought to you by the fine folks on the News4 assignment desk.

    LIKE FANTASY FOOTBALL?  HOW ABOUT FANTASY SUPREME COURT?
    Fairfax Times: "With autumn comes fantasy leagues, all night "draft picks" and clinical-like research on key players' stats. The competitive- minded place bets on everything -- sports teams, races and even election results.

    Why not place odds on U.S. Supreme Court verdicts?

    George Mason University law school graduate Josh Blackman, 26, found himself asking this very question while tracking last year's campaign finance case before the U.S. Supreme Court."

    ARLINGTON BOARD INSTRUCTIONS MANAGER TO RESTRAIN SPENDING
    ARLNow: “We are lucky to be Arlington,” county manager Barbara Donnellan said, kicking off the board’s initial guidance for the fiscal year 2012 budget.

    Donnellan was referring to the fact that property values — and, thus, tax collections — have stabilized in Arlington, while other local communities continue to feel the pinch from the recession.

    Even with a cautiously optimistic outlook, however, the county is still staring down a $25-35 million budget shortfall for FY 2012."

    GROUP TARGETS TAX FOR POTOMAC YARD STATION
    Washington Post: "Alexandria's Citizens for Common Cents has begun distributing 200 yard signs to 16 locations to protest a proposed special tax district to help pay for the Potomac Yard Metro station. The "Just Say No to Any Special Taxes" signs will be at high-traffic locations in the Potomac Greens and Del Ray neighborhoods, which could be affected by a new special tax.

    A new Metro station is part of Potomac Yard's multibillion-dollar redevelopment, with 7.5 million square feet of residential, retail and commercial space between Route 1 and the George Washington Memorial Parkway south of Four Mile Run and north of East Glebe Road. The station's cost is estimated to be between $190 million and $270 million."

    GARRETT PARK TEEN USES HIS TOWN AS A GARNISH
    Gazette: "If you see him foraging for food don't be alarmed; Gabe Mandel, 17, of Garrett Park isn't underfed, he's trying to capture the taste of his home town.

    Gabe is doing so by utilizing the often-overlooked or ignored vegetables and garnishes that grow wild throughout the town for his dishes, he said these naturally-occurring foods are ripe with a taste that's pure Garrett Park.

    "The French call it Terroir," he said, noting the term derives meaning from the word for land. "It's a word generally used in wine and it's supposed to describe the flavor of where you are.""