The Night Note: 10/19/10

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    NEWSLETTERS

    The following stories are brought to you by the fine folks on the News4 assignment desk.

    METRO GM MAY NOT BE SELECTED UNTIL END OF YEAR
    WTOP: "It's an agency that employs more than 10,000 people and hundreds of thousands of others rely on it every day.

    Yet months after Metro's former leader decided to resign, the transit agency still does not have a permanent leader at the helm.

    Metro leaders are now in the process of interviewing potential candidates for the job. But the selection process is expected to be measured and deliberate."

    O'MALLEY HAS 5-POINT EDGE IN LATEST POLL
    Gazette: "Gov. Martin O'Malley has a 5 percentage point lead over former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. according to a new survey released Monday night, just days before the state's six-day early voting period begins.

    The telephone poll of 816 likely voters, conducted last week by Annapolis polling firm Gonzales Research & Marketing Strategies, shows O'Malley favored to receive 47 percent of the vote compared with 42 percent for Ehrlich. Only 6 percent of participants were undecided with 4 percent saying they planned to vote for a third-party candidate."
     

    PAY RAISES UNLIKELY THIS YEAR FOR FAIRFAX TEACHERS
    Washington Examiner: " Fairfax County teachers probably will not receive the midyear pay raises they were hoping for after two years of salary freezes.

    The school board likely will use the $21.3 million in federal stimulus funding from the Education Jobs Fund grant for raises in the 2012 budget -- but some school board members were concerned that 2012 wasn't soon enough.

    "Morale is at an all-time low. It's at a breaking point," said Patricia Reed, suggesting that more and more teachers "are just punching the clock" and that turnover has climbed to 50 percent."
     

    WASHINGTON GHOSTS: HISTORIC STROLLS
    DCist: "Even if your Scooby sense doesn't feel sudden cold spots at the bottom of the stairs or unseen fingers clutching at your throat, a ghost tour can be an info-taining way to take in the history -- or legend -- of a city. I've taken numerous ghost tours in my travels -- the best combination of story and storyteller was a Key West tour, hosted by a man whose gravelly voice could be mistaken for Robin Williams, but far scarier. The variety of spooktacular ghost tours held in the Washington area provide the ghost-hunter and the skeptic alike an opportunity to learn more about what some say is one of the most haunted cities in America."