Detectives Looking for Anne Arundel County Police Impersonator

Anne Arundel County Police are looking for a man impersonating a police officer. 

On July 4, in the area of Crain Highway South near Green Branch Drive in Glen Burnie, Maryland, a woman was stopped by a man driving a police-style, white Ford Crown Victoria displaying a flashing blue and red dome light on the roof at about 1 a.m.

The man turned off all the car lights, exited the car, identified himself as Anne Arundel County Police and said he pulled the victim over for suspected drunken driving, according to an interview with the victim. 

He then asked for the victim's driver's license, went back to his car, and after a few minutes returned to the victim’s car, with the license, and asked the victim to step out of the car, police said. He had her blow into a device that registered ".000" and had the victim walk in a straight line, according to an interview with the victim. 

The victim stated the man’s behavior was intimidating and threatening. When the victim attempted to use a cellphone, the man stated she was free to go, returned to his car and sped off onto northbound Route 97, according to an interview with the victim.

The “police” car had gray wheel covers, a police package spotlight, a magnetic "bubble" light on the roof with a power cord going into the vehicle, and the driver’s door had a "Police" decal, almost the length of the door, that was written in black and outlined in yellow, according to the Anne Arundel County Eastern District Bureau of Patrol.

The car’s headlights were described as dull and “yellowish,” and detectives believe the car is at least a year 2000 model.

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The man stands about 6-feet tall and is described as white with a medium build, brown hair and a mustache. He was wearing a navy blue uniform shirt and pants, a silver Anne Arundel badge with “Williams” inscribed on it, and a generic “police” patch on shoulder.

He was not wearing any sort of duty belt, firearm or radio, but he was holding handcuffs.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Criminal Investigation Division Homeland Security & Intelligence Unit Tips Line at 410-222-4700. Callers may remain anonymous.

Anne Arundel County Police have a few tips when it comes to spotting a police impersonator:

  • If the vehicle stopping you is not marked, the emergency lights should be built in and are usually not a temporary light placed on the vehicle.
  • Try to stop in a well-lit area or a location where there are a lot of people present.
  • Turn on your emergency flashers but don’t turn off your car. Lock your doors.
  • Do not get out of the vehicle to meet the officer. For safety purposes, officers usually want you to remain in the vehicle.
  • Look for a uniform, official department jacket, and other equipment used by police officers for the performance of their duties. Check to see if the uniform pants match uniform shirt, or if the uniform shirt does not have patches, silver or gold buttons, epaulets on shoulders or pins on collar. Impersonators typically don’t have a utility belt with a firearm, magazine pouch, baton, handcuff case or radio.
  • If the officer is in plain clothes, look for identifying clothing and equipment. If unsure, explain to the “officer” that you are unsure about the situation and ask them to display official department identification and badge. Ask where they work and if you can contact their dispatch center to confirm their identity. You may also request a marked patrol unit respond.
  • Pay attention to what they are asking. Most officers will advise you of the reason for the stop and request your driver’s license, registration, and proof of insurance.
  • If they immediately tell you to get out of the car without any preliminary questions, be suspicious. Look for extreme nervousness when the impersonator speaks.
  • Trust your instincts. If they don’t seem to be a real police officer they are probably not. If they ask for inappropriate information or make inappropriate requests be aware.
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