Heatwave

DC Region Braces for First Summer Heatwave

"What happens is this dehydration puts a very significant strain on our heart that makes our heart work really, really hard. And sometimes our heart is not prepared to do so," Dr. Federico Asch, of Medstar Health and the American Heart Association, said.

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A heatwave expected to bring dangerously high temperatures to the D.C. area continues this week. It may take some by surprise and could create serious health issues if residents aren't careful. 

Storm Team4 says highs Thursday will warm into the mid to upper 90s. High humidity levels will make it uncomfortable outside. Areas east of I-95 are already under a heat advisory from 11 a.m. until 8 p.m. During the afternoon there will be a bit of a breeze with some widely scattered storms, but the heat index will be around and just above 100 degrees.

A group bike ride changes a bit when the evening is far from cool.

“We're stopping like every 10 miles just to rehydrate and everything, so [we're] trying to stay cool. And I'm the slowest, so I'm not getting that hot," one woman joked.

Storm Team4 Chief Meteorologist Doug Kammerer has the forecast.

A lack of the gradual acclimation to heat that typically takes place during spring and summer in our region could lead to more heat-related illnesses.

"What happens is this dehydration puts a very significant strain on our heart that makes our heart work really, really hard. And sometimes our heart is not prepared to do so," Dr. Federico Asch, of Medstar Health and the American Heart Association, said.

Children cooling off in a plaza fountain on 14th Street in Columbia Heights will likely have lots of company in the next few days, and temperatures in the upper 90s mean frozen treats become mood changers.

One business owner who normally parks his ice cream truck on the National Mall until 8 p.m. or so on weekdays, said he plans to extend hours straight through the weekend. 

“Since it's a hot day, we try to make everybody cold and happy," he said.

DC Parks and Recreation have set up sprinkler parks for children throughout the District, and you can go here to learn more about the mayor’s heat emergency plan.

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