Trump Promises to Call Saudi King About Missing Writer - NBC4 Washington
President Donald Trump

President Donald Trump

The latest news on President Donald Trump's presidency

Trump Promises to Call Saudi King About Missing Writer

Saudi Arabia has called the allegation it abducted or harmed Jamal Khashoggi "baseless" but offered no evidence

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Trump Doesn’t Want to Sanction Saudis Over Missing Writer

    Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist and Washington Post contributor, is missing and feared dead after he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last week. President Donald Trump says he wants to learn more about the incident but does not want to place sanctions on Saudi Arabia. (Published Thursday, Oct. 11, 2018)

    What to Know

    • The Washington Post, for which Jamal Khashoggi was a columnist, said it spoke to anonymous officials

    • Those officials, according to the Post, say Turkey has audio and video that prove Khashoggi was killed in the Saudi consulate

    • President Donald Trump said he would speak to the Saudi leader about Khashoggi's case

    President Donald Trump declared the U.S. will uncover the truth about what happened to journalist and U.S. resident Jamal Khashoggi, whose possible murder at Saudi hands after disappearing in Istanbul has captured worldwide attention. Trump promised to personally call Saudi Arabia's King Salman soon about "the terrible situation in Turkey."

    "We're going to find out what happened," Trump pledged Friday when questioned by reporters in Cincinnati where he was headlining a political rally.

    And in excerpts of an interview with CBS released Saturday morning, Trump said there would be “severe punishment” for Saudi Arabia if it was determined to have killed Khashoggi. He called the journalist's case “really terrible and disgusting.” 

    “It’s being investigated, it’s being looked at very, very strongly," Trump said. "And we would be very upset and angry if that were the case. As of this moment, they deny it, and they deny it vehemently. Could it be them? Yes.”

    Saudi Journalist Jamal Khashoggi Feared Dead After Entering Saudi Consulate

    [NATL] Saudi Journalist Jamal Khashoggi Feared Dead After Entering Saudi Consulate

    Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist and Washington Post contributor, is feared dead after he entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last week and has not been seen since. Khashoggi has been a vocal critic of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman. Khashoggi went to the consulate to pick up paperwork in order to marry his fiancee.

    (Published Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018)

    Khashoggi, a forceful critic of the Saudi government, went missing more than a week ago after entering a Saudi consulate in Istanbul, and Turkish officials have said they believe he was murdered there. U.S. officials say they are seeking answers from the Saudi government and are not yet accepting the Turkish government's conclusions.

    The Saudis have called accusations that they are responsible for Khashoggi's disappearance "baseless." Widely broadcast video shows the 59-year-old writer and Washington Post contributor entering the consulate on Tuesday of last week, but there is none showing him leaving.

    Separately, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo spoke to Khashoggi's fiancee, Hatice Cengiz, who accompanied him to the Saudi consulate, the State Department said Friday. No details of the conversation were released.

    In an interview Friday with The Associated Press, Cengiz said Khashoggi was not nervous when he entered the consulate to obtain paperwork required for their marriage.

    "He said, 'See you later my darling,' and went in," she told the AP.

    Citing anonymous sources, the Post reported Friday that Turkey's government has told U.S. officials it has audio and video proof that Khashoggi was killed and dismembered. The AP has not been able to confirm that report. In written responses to questions by the AP, Cengiz said Turkish authorities had not told her about any recordings and Khashoggi was officially "still missing."

    She said investigators were examining his cellphones, which he had left with her.

    Saudi Arabia says Khashoggi left the consulate. He hasn't been seen since, though his fiancee was waiting outside.

    Both Turkey and Saudi Arabia are important U.S. allies in the region. Trump said Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin will evaluate whether to attend a Saudi investor conference later this month. Mnuchin had indicated earlier Friday he still planned to attend.

    On Thursday, Trump had said U.S. relations with Saudi Arabia were "excellent" and he was reluctant to scuttle highly lucrative U.S. weapons deals with Riyadh. A number of members of Congress have pressed the Trump administration to impose sanctions on the country in response to the Khashoggi affair.

    A delegation from Saudi Arabia arrived in Turkey on Friday as part of an investigation into the writer's disappearance. In a statement posted on Twitter, the Saudis welcomed the joint effort and said the kingdom was keen "to sustain the security and safety of its citizenry, wherever they might happen to be."

    Cengiz said she and the journalist would have been married this week and had planned a life together split between Istanbul and the United States, where Khashoggi had been living in self-imposed exile since last year.

    She had appealed for help to Trump, who earlier this week said he would invite her to the White House.

    Cengiz didn't respond to a question about that, but earlier on Friday she urged Trump on Twitter to use his clout to find out what happened.

    "What about Jamal Khashoggi?" she wrote in response to a tweet by Trump in which he said he said he had been "working very hard" to free an American evangelical pastor who has been held for two years in Turkey. Andrew Brunson was released late Friday.

    Amid growing concern over Khashoggi's fate, French President Emmanuel Macron said his country wanted to know "the whole truth" about the writer's disappearance, calling the early details about the case "very worrying."

    Macron said "I'm waiting for the truth and complete clarity to be made" since the matter is "very serious." He spoke Friday in Yerevan, Armenia, to French broadcasters RFI and France 24.

    In Germany, Chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman, Steffen Seibert, said Berlin was also "very concerned" about the writer's disappearance and called on Saudi Arabia to "participate fully" in clearing up reports that he had been killed.

    Global business leaders began reassessing their ties with Saudi Arabia, stoking pressure on the Gulf kingdom to explain what happened to Khashoggi.

    Khashoggi, who was considered close to the Saudi royal family, had become a critic of the current government and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the 33-year-old heir apparent who has introduced reforms but has shown little tolerance for criticism.

    As a contributor to The Washington Post, Khashoggi has written extensively about Saudi Arabia, including criticism of its war in Yemen, its recent diplomatic spat with Canada and its arrest of women's rights activists after the lifting of a ban on women driving.

    Those policies are all seen as initiatives of the crown prince, who has also presided over a roundup of activists and businessmen.