Pompeo Skips Moscow to Meet With European Officials on Iran - NBC4 Washington
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Pompeo Skips Moscow to Meet With European Officials on Iran

Twice last week Pompeo changed his travel schedule at the last minute, also citing matters dealing with Iran

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Pompeo Skips Moscow to Meet With European Officials on Iran
    Mandel Ngan/AP, File
    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo boards a plane before departing from London Stansted Airport, north of London, Monday, May 9, 2019.

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has changed the schedule for his latest trip to Europe, substituting a stop in Moscow for one in Brussels to discuss Iran and other issues with European officials.

    A State Department official says Pompeo, who departed Sunday night, is still expected to meet Tuesday in Sochi with Russian President Vladimir Putin and Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov. The official isn't authorized to discuss the itinerary by name and requested anonymity.

    The visit to Sochi will be Pompeo's first to Russia as secretary of state.

    Twice last week Pompeo changed his travel schedule at the last minute, also citing matters dealing with Iran. He cancelled a stop in Berlin to fly to Iran, then canceled a stop in Greenland to fly home from London.

    Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    [NATL] Watch: Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Full Opening Statement at House Hearing on Reparations

    Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of “The Case for Reparations,” testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee during a hearing on whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves. 

    He delivered a rebuttal to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's comments that "no one currently alive was responsible for that," which Coates called a "strange theory of governance." 

    "Well into this century the United States was still paying out pensions to the heirs of civil war soldiers," he said. "We honor treaties that date back some 200 years despite no one being alive who signed those treaties. Many of us would love to be taxed for the things we are solely and individually responsible for. But we are American citizens and this bound to a collective enterprise that extends beyond our individual and personal reach."

    (Published Wednesday, June 19, 2019)