Pennsylvania Court Throws Out Congressional Boundaries - NBC4 Washington
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Pennsylvania Court Throws Out Congressional Boundaries

The court said the boundaries "clearly, plainly and palpably" violate the state's constitution

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Join the Fight to End Senior Hunger
    AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File
    Shown is the Pennsylvania Capitol building in Harrisburg, Pa., Monday, July 10, 2017.

    UPDATE: Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf has said he supports the plan to redraw congressional lines.

    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court struck down the state's congressional map Monday, granting a major victory to Democrats who charged that the 18 districts were unconstitutionally gerrymandered to benefit Republicans.

    The Democratic-controlled court, which said that the districts violate the state constitution, gave the Republican-controlled Legislature until Feb. 9 to pass a replacement and Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf until Feb. 15 to submit it to the court. Otherwise, the justices said they will adopt a plan in an effort to keep the May 15 primary election on track.

    The court said the boundaries "clearly, plainly and palpably" violate the state's constitution, and blocked it from remaining in effect for the 2018 elections. The deadline to file paperwork to run in primaries for the state's congressional seats is March 6.

    Trump on Poor Relations With Russia: ‘I Hold Both Countries Responsible’

    [NATL] Trump on Poor Relations With Russia: ‘I Hold Both Countries Responsible’

    President Trump was asked if he held Russia accountable for a decline in relations with the U.S. He said there is blame on both sides.

    (Published Monday, July 16, 2018)

    The defendants — top Republican lawmakers — said they were outraged by the decision. They said it lacks clarity and respect for the constitution, and that they would ask the U.S. Supreme Court to step in and halt the decision.

    Republicans who controlled the Legislature and governor's office following the 2010 census broke decades of geographical precedent when redrawing the map, producing contorted shapes, including one dubbed "Goofy kicking Donald Duck."

    They shifted whole counties and cities into different districts in an effort to protect a Republican advantage in the congressional delegation. They succeeded, securing 13 of 18 seats in a state where registered Democratic voters outnumber Republicans 5 to 4.

    "We won the whole thing," said David Gersch of the Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer law firm in Washington, D.C., which is helping represent the group of registered Democrats who filed the lawsuit last June.

    The decision has immediate implications for the 2018 election, meaning that 14 sitting members of Congress and dozens more people are running or considering running in districts they may no longer live in.

    The March 13 special election in a vacant southwestern Pennsylvania seat is unaffected by the order, the justices said.

    Trump, Putin News Conference: Watch the Full Q&A

    [NATL] Trump, Putin News Conference: Watch the Full Q&A

    Watch President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin answer questions from reporters following their summit in Helsinki, Finland, on July 17, 2018.

    (Published 6 hours ago)

    The U.S. Supreme Court also is weighing whether redistricting can be so partisan that it violates the U.S. Constitution, in cases from Maryland and Wisconsin. The high court has never struck down an electoral map as a partisan gerrymander.