Detroit's Resurgence Not Strong Enough to Solve Old Problems - NBC4 Washington
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Detroit's Resurgence Not Strong Enough to Solve Old Problems

The station reported that 87 of the district's roughly 100 schools were closed Monday

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    5 Ways to Make the City Your Gym
    AP
    Detroit teachers march outside the district headquarters, Monday, May 2, 2016, in Detroit. Detroit Public Schools transition manager Steven Rhodes says 45,628 of approximately 46,000 students were forced to miss classes Monday as 1,562 teachers called in sick. The mass sick-out has forced the district to close 94 of its 97 schools. Detroit's schools are expected to be out of cash starting July 1. The state earlier gave the district $48.7 million in emergency funding to keep it open through June 30 as the Legislature considers a $720 million restructuring plan.

    A year and a half after the city emerged from the largest municipal bankruptcy in U.S. history, Detroit 2.0 is still beset by crippling bugs in the system.

    Amid a bribery scandal that has led to corruption charges against 14 employees, the school system is running out of money and will have to stop paying teachers and staff on June 30, according to a school system memo obtained by the teachers union, NBC News reported.

    The Detroit Federation of Teachers, which called an emergency meeting Sunday afternoon after local NBC affiliate WDIV reported details of the memo, urged a district-wide teacher "sickout" on Monday. The station reported that 87 of the district's roughly 100 schools were closed Monday.

    The school system confirmed the dire straits in a statement Saturday night, saying there will be "no funds available for the district to conduct summer school or provide the year-round special education services that a number of our students rely on."