Trump to Name Acting Interior Secretary to Lead Department - NBC4 Washington
National & International News
The day’s top national and international news

Trump to Name Acting Interior Secretary to Lead Department

Democrats and environmental groups say Bernhardt is vulnerable to conflicts of interest

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Trump to Name Acting Interior Secretary to Lead Department
    AP
    Then-Deputy Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt speaks during the annual state of Colorado energy luncheon sponsored by the Colorado Petroleum council Thursday, July 26, 2018, in Denver.

    President Donald Trump said Monday that he is nominating David Bernhardt, a former lobbyist for oil and gas companies and other industries, to head the Interior Department despite objections from environmental groups that Bernhardt already was making regulatory decisions on the country's natural resources to benefit industries.

    Trump tweeted his intention to nominate Bernhardt, now the Interior Department's acting head, to replace former Secretary Ryan Zinke. Zinke resigned in December amid ethics investigations.

    "David has done a fantastic job from the day he arrived," Trump tweeted.

    In a statement, Bernhardt called it a "humbling privilege to be nominated to lead a department whose mission I love, to accomplish the balanced, commonsense vision of our president."

    Ala. Lawmakers Pass Bill Banning Virtually All Abortions

    [NATL] Ala. Lawmakers Pass Bill Banning Virtually All Abortions

    Alabama lawmakers have approved a bill banning virtually all abortions, including for women impregnated via rape or incest, making the act a felony at any stage of pregnancy with no exceptions. The bill now heads to Alabama Governor Kay Ivey to sign.

    (Published Wednesday, May 15, 2019)

    Bernhardt's reputation as a technocrat working efficiently behind the scenes stands as a 180-degree turn from that of his flamboyant predecessor. Zinke grabbed attention when he rode a horse to his first day at Interior. Zinke soon was garnering headlines over allegations involving travel and allegations of possible conflicts of interest.

    Bernhardt has remained low-profile as Trump weighed him and a half-dozen other reported contenders — chiefly, Western lawmakers — as successors to Zinke.

    As acting secretary, Bernhardt drew criticism in recent weeks from environmental groups, tribes and others for continuing to process paperwork for oil and gas projects while other agencies were closed for routine work during this winter's partial government shutdown.

    'Tonight': Buttigieg on His 2020 Campaign, 'GoT' Predictions

    [NATL] 'Tonight': Mayor Pete Buttigieg Discusses His 2020 Campaign and 'Game of Thrones' Predictions

    South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg explains how he tracked down Jerry Seinfeld to make him accept a key to the city, reacts to Trump's nickname for him, breaks down his 2020 campaign platform and shares his analysis about who will claim the Iron Throne in "Game of Thrones."

    (Published Tuesday, May 14, 2019)

    The Interior Department called its effort important to bolstering U.S. energy independence.

    "Bernhardt got this nomination as a reward for months of work cramming America's natural heritage into a wood chipper," said Kieran Suckling, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity advocacy group, one of many environmental organizations condemning Trump's intended nomination. "Confirming him as Interior secretary would be a boon to polluters and a colossal disaster for our public lands and endangered species."

    Rep. Raul Grijalva, D-Ariz., chairman of the House Natural Resources Committee, said lawmakers would be watching to see whether Bernhardt's former industry ties were influencing his policy decisions.

    A Look at How Tariffs Could Affect Prices in US

    [NATL] A Look at How Tariffs Could Affect Prices in US

    As the United States and China continue to engage in a trade war, here are some ways U.S. consumers could be affected.

    (Published Monday, May 13, 2019)

    "David Bernhardt spent much of his career lobbying for fossil fuel and agricultural interests, and the president putting him in charge of regulating his former clients is a perfect example of everything wrong with this administration," Grijalva said in a statement.

    Republican lawmakers praised Trump's pick.

    "David Bernhardt ... brings tremendous leadership with him from our home state of #Colorado and I look forward to a swift confirmation process," Rep. Ken Buck tweeted.

    A Timeline of WikiLeaks' Julian Assange's Time in Self-Exile

    [NATL]A Timeline of WikiLeaks' Julian Assange's Time in Self-Exile

    WikiLeaks' founder Julian Assange had spent up to six years in self-imposed exile at the Ecuadorean embassy in London until he was forcibly carried out and arrested by British police. These were the events that led up to it.

    (Published Monday, May 13, 2019)

    Bernhardt, who is from Colorado, first served in Interior as a political appointee under President George W. Bush, becoming the agency's top lawyer.

    After his first round at Interior, Bernhardt worked at a Washington law and lobbying firm on behalf of mining companies, oil and gas giants, a politically powerful Western water agency and other groups that have business before the Interior Department.

    Coming back to Interior as Zinke's deputy, Bernhardt recused himself from decisions involving a long list of former industry clients to avoid conflicts of interest under ethics rules.

    US Raises Tariffs on Chinese Imports by 25 Percent

    [NATL] US Raises Tariffs on Chinese Imports by 25 Percent

    The U.S. hiked tariffs against Chinese imported goods yet again, bringing duties from 10% on $200 billion to 25% on $250 billion worth of goods. Industries reliant on trade between the US and China says they will have to pass the higher fees onto U.S. consumers.

    (Published Friday, May 10, 2019)

    Republicans say Bernhardt's revolving-door experience makes him an informed regulator in matters before the agency. Democrats and environmental groups say he's vulnerable to conflicts of interest.

    Under leadership of Zinke and Bernhardt, the Interior Department has pushed to open more Alaskan wilderness and offshore waters to oil and gas development.