Photos: Smithsonian’s New Dino Hall Stars T. Rex, Allosaurus & More

Check out some of the 700+ specimens that will be on display at the National Museum of Natural History starting Saturday.

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This "Allosaurus fragilis" skeleton was the first nearly complete "Allosaurus" found.
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Check out some of the more than 700 specimens that will be on display at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History starting June 8. This T. Rex, found in Montana 30 years ago, is the centerpiece of the new fossil hall.
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This T. Rex, found in Montana 30 years ago, is the centerpiece of the new fossil hall at the Smithsonian. It will go on display showing its power over a Triceratops.
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Woolly Mammoths went extinct due to the changing climate at the end of the Ice Age, and because of a new predator: humans.
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This Allosaurus skeleton was the first nearly complete "Allosaurus fragilis" found.
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This Allosaurus skeleton was the first nearly complete "Allosaurus fragilis" found.
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Though it may look like a crocodile, this phytosaur is not actually closely related to the animal living today.
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Though it may look like a crocodile, this phytosaur is not actually closely related to the animal living today.
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"Megaloceros giganteus," though it is often called "Irish Elk," is actually most closely related to fallow deer, and ranged far beyond Ireland. This is the Smithsonian's oldest mounted fossil skeleton, on display since 1872.
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Fossil palm leaves, like this one, existing in climates now far too cold to support that kind of life are the reason we know that Earth's climate used to be much warmer than it is now.
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This "Eurypterus remipes" is an example of one of the first terrestrial arthropods — one of the first animals to settle on land once microbes and plants provided food.
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