Metropolitan Police Department

Retired DC Officer Reacts to Investigation, Says He Had Coworkers in the KKK

Sources close to the investigation told News4 that the officer on leave works in the intelligence unit, which is in charge of gathering information on protests and marches in the city.

NBC Universal, Inc.

A D.C. police lieutenant has been placed on administrative leave while he undergoes some type of investigation – which sources say have to do with ties to a white supremacist group. On Saturday, a retired Metropolitan Police Department officer told News4 that the allegations don’t surprise him. 

“During my time in the police department, we had individuals that were part of the Ku Klux Klan that were very open about it,” retired officer Ronald Hampton said. 

Hampton said while he worked for D.C. police, he often had to work alone to avoid racist coworkers. He also said he mentors a current officer who’s dealing with many of the same issues.

“She talks about the kind of open discrimination, the kind of indifference that goes on in her section where she works, and so it’s still there,” Hampton said.  

While he discusses those shared experiences, the White Supremacy in Policing Prevention Act currently makes its way through the D.C. Council.

It was introduced by council member Janeese Lewis George shortly after Jan. 6, and would require the D.C. auditor to investigate police ties to white supremacy. 

The bill had a hearing in May and received public support according to the council member's office, but has not been advanced since.

“The individuals who get those jobs really need to be thoroughly vetted in terms of their behavior, their past,” Hampton said.  

Police Chief Robert Contee said the allegations against the officer on leave, identified by sources as Lt. Shane Lemond, are serious enough that MPD is working with the Department of Justice and the FBI to investigate.

He also answered questions on Feb. 17 about whether other officers could be involved with white supremacy groups.

"Not that there's anything overt or anything like that that's been brought to our attention, but I feel fairly confident that when those things are brought to our attention... that is not something that is cultural with respect to the MPD," Contee said.

Sources close to the investigation told News4 that Lamond works in the intelligence unit, which is in charge of gathering information on protests and marches in the city.

Contact Us