Photos: Baltimore Trying to Stem Urban Decay in ‘Ghost Neighborhoods’

Even with job gains, stately historic districts, and gleaming waterfront areas, Baltimore grapples with urban decay and population decline.

5 photos
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Getty Images
In this Oct. 26, 2018 photo, a man walks past vacant rowhomes in the Harlem Park neighborhood of Baltimore. "There are whole sections of our city that look like 1980's Beirut," said Carol Ott, an advocate for tenants' rights in Baltimore who has helped bring the punishing scope of the decades-old problem to light. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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AP
In this Nov. 13, 2018 photo, a pair of rowhomes, one occupied, the other boarded up, stand surrounded by vacant lots at dusk in Baltimore. At a time when rival cities that have grappled with issues of urban decay are gaining residents, Baltimore's decades-long disappearing act is only continuing. It has led all U.S. cities in population loss for the last two years running. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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Alex Matthews
In this Oct. 26, 2018 photo, LaShelle Rollins and her daughter Arrianna, 6, play on a school playground in view of vacant rowhomes in the Harlem Park neighborhood of Baltimore. "People around here want real changes, real opportunities," she said, watching her little girl play in the schoolyard. "I say a prayer every day we walk out the door and face those empty houses: God, please keep us safe." (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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CSNPhilly.com
In this Oct. 26, 2018 photo, LaShelle Rollins and her daughter Arrianna, 6, pose for a photo in front of boarded-up rowhomes on their block in the Harlem Park neighborhood of Baltimore. Life in an emptied-out, rundown cityscape is a slog and Rollins is worn out by all of it: The sounds of late-night interlopers stomping down the stairs of a musty wreck next door; a constant fear of fire set by vandals; the social isolation; the rats. With no faith in a prompt police response, they keep a bat at the ready. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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AP
In this Oct. 26, 2018 photo, vacant rowhomes are visible from resident Nayeka Scott's living room in the Harlem Park neighborhood of Baltimore. A sea of roughly 16,000 uninhabitable row homes with weeds growing out of boarded-up windows are symbols of this city's enduring social divide. Housing researchers say some 20,000 other city properties are unoccupied and pose a latent risk of becoming crumbling shells in the future. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
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