coronavirus

Coronavirus in DC, Maryland, Virginia: What to Know on Aug. 31

Here's what to know about the coronavirus data, resources and reopenings across the D.C. area

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It's a first day of school like no other: Many students in the D.C. area began a new school year Monday with all-online learning.

The day wasn't without its tech troubles. A major website used by Charles County Public Schools students briefly went down Monday morning, and Prince George’s County Public Schools reported "isolated technological problems with Zoom" that have now been resolved. D.C. Public Schools and Frederick and Montgomery County Schools, among others, also began classes Monday. 

Meanwhile, cases of coronavirus are rising among the civil servants and police officers who serve on Capitol Hill. A union official said at least 41 U.S. Capitol Police officers have tested positive for the virus since March. Though many have returned to work, at least 60 employees remain on administrative leave due to possible exposure or illnesses, according to records released by a U.S. House committee. Cases are also rising among contractors and civil servants who work for the architect of the Capitol.


What the Data Shows

While there were no extreme jumps in cases reported in the D.C. region Monday, there are indications that new COVID-19 cases are trending upward in Virginia.

The data shows that Greater Northern Virginia has little to do with the increase, but rather the rest of the state is to blame for the surge.

The Greater NoVA region is currently averaging 296 new cases each day, down three cases from last week. In the rest of the state, however, seven-day averages have surged from 588 cases last week to 699 cases on Monday.

In D.C., average daily cases (52) and daily hospitalizations (70) have remained stable.

Cases in Maryland have declined steadily over the past two weeks. Maryland reported a seven-day average of 511 cases today, down from 565 a week ago and 637 two weeks ago.

The map below shows the number of coronavirus cases diagnosed per 1,000 residents.

Coronavirus Cases in DC, Maryland and Virginia

COVID-19 cases by population in D.C. and by county in Maryland and Virginia

Source: DC, MD and VA Health Departments
Credit: Anisa Holmes / NBC Washington


Local Coronavirus Headlines

  • Dozens of inmates at a West Virginia prison have tested positive for the coronavirus, health officials said. Read more.
  • Ocean City is postponing plans to re-deck its iconic boardwalk because of a lumber shortage caused by the coronavirus outbreak. Read more.
  • Arlington County police have begun enforcing social distancing in the nightlife area of Clarendon. Read more.
  • D.C.'s Department of Health put out an updated list of high-risk states with travel restrictions Thursday, and Delaware is no longer on the list. Read more.
  • Virginians on unemployment will get an extra $300 on top of what the state pays out. Read more.
  • Special needs students are among the first groups who should get in-person instruction, Fairfax County school officials say. Read more.
  • The federal government has started sending new COVID-19 testing systems to nursing homes around the country in hopes that the rapid results provided by antigen tests will slow the spread of the virus. Long-term care facilities certainly welcome that assistance, but some have major concerns about those tests. Get the News4 I-Team report.

Reopening Tracker


How to Stay Safe

There are ways to lower your risk of catching coronavirus. Here are guidelines from the CDC:

  • Anyone over the age of 2 should wear a mask or face covering. Keep it over your nose and mouth.
  • Wash your hands often. When you do, scrub with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. As a backup, use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid close contact with anyone who lives outside your home. That means staying six feet away from anyone outside your circle, even if you're wearing masks.
  • Always cover coughs and sneezes.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.

Sophia Barnes, Andrea Swalec and Anisa Holmes contributed to this report

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