Ellicott City

Gov. Hogan Visits Businesses, Leaders in Ellicott City After Uptick in Violence Against Asians

Hogan visited Korean Way to speak with local Asian business owners and leaders and to show support with a message of solidarity

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Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan visited local Asian businesses and community leaders in Ellicott City Monday in the wake of a rise in violence against Asian Americans.  Hogan and his wife also visited businesses on Korean Way, a five-mile stretch along Route 40 that is home to approximately 166 Korean businesses. 

After the Atlanta shooting last week, many Asian businesses are taking action and making sacrifices -- all for their safety.  

Danielle Han works at Bon Appetit Bakery along Korean Way. It used to stay open until 11 p.m. until recently. They've since changed it to 8 p.m.

"We’re losing money because a lot more people come in at nighttime, and we can’t let them in because we have to close at eight,” Han said.

Still, she said they value safety over making sales. They’ve also stepped up their security and have gotten new cameras. Han said she fears for her family.

"It makes me worried about my grandparents who live in New York, they live by themselves. What if they’re next?" Han said. 

Acupuncturist Hyung Jun said he recently heard the news of elderly Asians getting assaulted at random. 

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"At this moment, I don’t know why the Asians, why they hate the Asians because of coronavirus,” Jun said.

Hogan visited Korean Way to speak with local Asian business owners and leaders and to show support with a message of solidarity. 

“We’re very concerned about some of the racist rhetoric and violence that we’re seeing in some parts of the community,” Hogan said. 

Asian Americans Advancing Justice -- an organization that tracks incidents of hate -- recorded nearly 4,000 incidents since the pandemic began.

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