coronavirus

Coronavirus in DC, Maryland, Virginia: What to Know on Aug. 30

Here's what to know about the coronavirus data, resources and reopenings across the D.C. area

NBCUniversal, Inc.

As you consider the remainder of your Sunday and the Labor Day weekend ahead, D.C.’s mayor asks that you consider this before heading to a party: “Do you really have to be there?” 

In a tweet Sunday morning, Mayor Muriel Bowser reminded D.C. residents to choose their activities wisely, wear a mask and stay 6 feet from others as the coronavirus continues to spread in the community. 

D.C. reported another 34 cases of COVID-19 on Sunday and the death of a 36-year-old man. More than 13,000 people have been diagnosed with the virus and at least 606 have died. 

Maryland reported another 497 cases and three additional deaths. Virginia reported another 891 cases and one additional death. 

Amid these numbers, many students in the D.C. area will go back to school Monday, with all-online learning. The first day of school is Monday in D.C. and Frederick, Montgomery and Prince George’s counties, among others. Some districts spent the final days handing out laptops and mobile hot spots. 


What the Data Shows

For the moment, the numbers are a mixed bag. In D.C., Maryland and Virginia, the daily numbers of new cases and deaths are about steady. 

In D.C., community spread remains a problem and many people being diagnosed had no known contact with someone who was quarantined. 

Maryland is flagging drops in the percentage of people tested for the virus who test positive. 

Hospitalizations have dropped to their lowest level in the past five months, Gov. Larry Hogan pointed out. 

In Virginia, the daily case number has trended upward since Aug. 21. 

The map below shows the number of coronavirus cases diagnosed per 1,000 residents.

Coronavirus Cases in DC, Maryland and Virginia

COVID-19 cases by population in D.C. and by county in Maryland and Virginia

Source: DC, MD and VA Health Departments
Credit: Anisa Holmes / NBC Washington


Local Coronavirus Headlines

  • D.C. Public Schools are back in session Monday, Aug. 31 and city officials have guidance on how to make it as smooth as possible. Read more.
  • Ocean City is postponing plans to re-deck its iconic boardwalk because of a lumber shortage caused by the coronavirus outbreak. Read more.
  • Arlington County police will enforce social distancing in the nightlife area of Clarendon starting Friday and violators will be issued fines of up to $100 after a weekend-long warning period. Read more.
  • D.C. has updated the list of states for which the city has travel restrictions because of the coronavirus pandemic. Read more.
  • Virginians on unemployment will get an extra $300 on top of what the state pays out. Read more.
  • Special needs students are among the first groups who should get in-person instruction, Fairfax County school officials say. Read more.
  • The federal government has started sending new COVID-19 testing systems to nursing homes around the country in hopes that the rapid results provided by antigen tests will slow the spread of the virus. Long-term care facilities certainly welcome that assistance, but some have major concerns about those tests. Get the News4 I-Team report.
  • Most people recently diagnosed with the coronavirus in D.C. had no known contact with someone who had the virus and did not attend events or travel, new data from the city says. Read more.

Reopening Tracker


How to Stay Safe

There are ways to lower your risk of catching coronavirus. Here are guidelines from the CDC:

  • Anyone over the age of 2 should wear a mask or face covering. Keep it over your nose and mouth.
  • Wash your hands often. When you do, scrub with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. As a backup, use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid close contact with anyone who lives outside your home. That means staying six feet away from anyone outside your circle, even if you're wearing masks.
  • Always cover coughs and sneezes.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces.

Sophia Barnes, Andrea Swalec and Anisa Holmes contributed to this report

Contact Us