connecticut Avenue

Connecticut Avenue Redesign to Remove Reversible Lanes, Add Protected Bike Lanes

The project is expected to take 18 months to complete.

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Connecticut Avenue, one of Washington, D.C.’s, main arteries, will be redesigned between the Chevy Chase and Woodley Park neighborhoods in Northwest, Mayor Muriel Bowser and the District Department of Transportation announced Wednesday afternoon. 

The plan will remove the reversible rush-hour lanes and will add protected bike lanes on both sides of the street.

Bicyclists think it’s about time. 

Joshua White, who bikes to and from work on Connecticut Avenue NW, said the current commute is dangerous, especially during rush hour.

“It’s absolutely terrifying,” White said. “I’m always afraid that I’m going to get hit and killed by somebody who just doesn’t care.”

He’s not the only one. 

“I think it’s a great plan from my perspective and yes I would definitely use them,” bicyclist Margaret Gleason said. 

Most parking on Connecticut Avenue between Livingston and Calvert streets will be gone, but drivers may be able to park in a few designated areas. Some residents of nearby neighborhoods are concerned drivers will then start parking in their neighborhoods.

Mayor Muriel Bowser said the bike lanes could cut crashes by 17%, reduce traffic and make the roads safer for pedestrians.

Councilmember Mary Cheh agreed.

“In terms of parking, we’re beginning to learn not to have our public spaces used as effectively parking lots for vehicles and the more we have alternative transit, the fewer cars we’ll have to have,” Cheh said. “I think people who bike home to work deserve to get there and not worry about getting hit by cars.”

According to a media release, the redesign concept had broad support from the community, including multiple Advisory Neighborhood Commissions.

The project is expected to take 18 months to complete.

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