Trial Set in DC Mansion Murders Case - NBC4 Washington

Trial Set in DC Mansion Murders Case

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Trial Date Set for Man Accused in DC Mansion Murders Case

    It's been nearly two years since a couple, their young son and the woman who worked as their housekeeper were killed in a mansion in Northwest D.C. News4's Meagan Fitzgerald has information on the trial and why the preparation is taking so long. (Published Friday, Feb. 3, 2017)

    A trial date has been set for the man accused of killing a couple, their young son and their housekeeper in a Northwest Washington mansion over a year and a half ago. 

    The trial for Darron Wint will begin Sept. 4, 2018, at 11 a.m.

    The victims -- Savvas Savopoulos, 46; his wife, Amy, 47; their 10-year-old son, Philip, and housekeeper Veralicia Figueroa, 57 -- were found dead inside the Savopoulos family's multi-million-dollar Northwest D.C., mansion in May 2015. 

    Wint of Lanham, Maryland, kidnapped the victims inside their home, extorted $40,000 from them, killed them and set fire to the $3 million house, according to police. He allegedly held the victims captive for roughly 18 hours.

    Prosecutors had been pushing for a trial date for some time, but at the last status hearing, the defense said it needed more time to test the evidence. 

    The prosecution said it has tested hundreds of items found in the Savopoulos home, and DNA linked Wint to five items. 

    Wint pleaded not guilty last year to the 20 felony charges he's facing in the brutal crime. The murder charges include four counts each of felony murder in the course of a kidnapping, felony murder in the course of a burglary and felony premeditated murder.

    Wint faces life in prison without possibility for release on each murder charge. The minimum sentence is 30 years on each murder charge.

    Police previously said they believed Wint had help from others holding the Savopouloses and Figueroa captive, according to charging documents, but no other suspects have been identified.