Metro Gets Backlash for Proposed Service Hours Cutback - NBC4 Washington

Metro Gets Backlash for Proposed Service Hours Cutback

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    NEWSLETTERS

    DC Leaders Pushing Back Against Plan to Cut Metro's Hours

    Metro wants to cut hours for its rail service to allow for more maintenance, but District officials aren't entirely on board. Transportation reporter Adam Tuss has the story. (Published Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016)

    What to Know

    • Some Metro riders said they are thinking about dropping Metro altogether.

    • Metro staff recommended closing the rail system at 11:30 p.m. on weekdays, 1 a.m. on Friday and Saturday and 11 p.m. on Sundays.

    • Stations would open at 5 a.m. on weekdays, 7 a.m. on Saturdays and 8 a.m. on Sundays.

    Washington, D.C., leaders are pushing back against Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority’s proposal to cut Metro hours so that maintenance crews can have more time to fix the system.

    On Monday, Metro staff recommended closing the rail system at 11:30 p.m. on weekdays, 1 a.m. on Friday and Saturday and 11 p.m. on Sundays. Stations would open at 5 a.m. on weekdays, 7 a.m. on Saturdays and 8 a.m. on Sundays. The opening and closing times would be reassessed in 2019.

    The formal recommendation will be made at Thursday's board meeting.

    Mayor Muriel Bowser said the plan to keep shorter hours can't be a long term solution. Some Metro riders said they are thinking about dropping Metro altogether.

    Jason Cotrell said he moved to the area partly because of the Metro system. He said the transit agency's plan to scale back service could dramatically change his lifestyle.

    “We live at Shady Grove. We rented there, because it's easy to walk across the street to the Metro. Why am I paying extra rent if that's a factor?” Cotrell said. “You could live in Germantown or Clarksburg and catch the MARC. It is more reliable."

    Bowser and Metro Board Chairman Jack Evans took hard stands against Metro's current plan to cut rail hours for a two-year period.

    "We can't continue to be asked to support a system that doesn't serve the needs of our region," Bowser said.

    “This can only be a temporary measure for one year," Evans said.

    Cotrell said Metro has lost its focus.

    "I have said since day one that if they put the customer first, then safety and everything else comes along with it," he said.

    It's still unclear which plan Metro will take when it comes to cutting hours. Any change to metro train schedules wouldn't happen until July 2017.