Local Leads: 7/12/10 - NBC4 Washington

Local Leads: 7/12/10

News you need to know

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Top 4 Reasons to Go to ZooLights
    Getty Images

    The following stories have been hand-selected by the Assignment Desk at News4:

    BANNED SOAP STILL ON SHELVES
    With little fanfare, the dishwasher detergent aisle at your local grocery store was drastically changed on July 1 - at least in some stores. Joshua McKerrow — The Capital Some stores still are selling dishwasher detergents that contain phosphorus, despite a ban on the ingredient that went into effect July 1.   That's when a new state law went into effect banning the use of phosphorus in dish detergent, a move aimed at helping the long-suffering Chesapeake Bay. Despite the new law, five out of 10 Annapolis-area stores checked by The Capital still had some phosphorus-containing detergent on the shelves (The Capital)

    POWER BILL WOES
    You might be a little shocked if you haven't taken a look at your electricity bill lately.  A 150 percent energy tax increase went into effect July 1 in Montgomery County. It will be in effect for two years.  The tax per kilowatt hour of electricity use jumped from half a cent to 1.3 cents. The cost per therm of natural gas rose from 4 cents to 11.5 cents. (wtop.com)

    PORN MOGUL COMES TO WASHINGTON
    An obscenity trial against pornography bigwig John Stagliano and his business opens Tuesday in a case with sweeping First Amendment implications that could significantly alter the $10 billion adult entertainment industry. Stagliano, the porn mogul better known as Buttman, faces 32 years in prison. He and his company, Evil Angel Productions, also face $7 million in fines, for making fetish films with titles unfit to print in a family newspaper and selling them through the mail and over the Internet. (Washington Examiner)

    PUPPY LOVE
    When a marriage crumbles, it's often the little ones who get hurt the most, and they don't get much littler than Lucky, the 16-pound Lhasa apso at the center of Craig Myers v. Gayle Myers.  When the Calvert County couple separated, it was easy to sort out such things as the house and the bank accounts. What wasn't so easy was Lucky. They both wanted her. (Washington Post)