Counter Intelligence: King of Bling - NBC4 Washington

Counter Intelligence: King of Bling

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    The president was given a massive gold pendant by King Abdullah upon his arrival to Saudi Arabia.

    See why Obama is rocking bling and take a look at our list of must-reads that will have you chatting at the lunch counter, over IM or wherever it is that people actually talk these days.

    • Obama is king of bling. The president was given a massive gold pendant by King Abdullah upon his arrival to Saudi Arabia. When an aide approached him with the necklace, Obama said, "Goodness gracious. That's something there." The blingtastic jewelry is called the King Abdul Aziz Order of Merit, the country's highest honor, and was given to Obama by King Abdullah at the start of their bilateral meeting at the King's Farm in Riyadh.
       
    • Neil Armstrong reportedly flubbed his most famous line when he stepped onto the surface of the moon. He was supposed to say, "One small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind" but he dropped the "a" during the pre-scripted moment. The astronaut argues he used the "a" but his Ohio accent and potential transmission problems were to blame for the apparent slip-up.
       
    • A woman who survived the tempest that was the basis for the book and movie "The Perfect Storm" was convicted of illegally fishing in Canada. Author Linda Greenlaw was the last person to have contact with the swordfish boat "Andrea Gail" before it sank in a 1991 storm. Authorities who arrested Greenlaw and a second individual in September are seeking a $50,000 fine and to have the catch seized.
       
    • Wal-Mart says it will create 22,000 jobs in the U.S. this year. The number is 10,000 fewer jobs than the discount chain added last year. The store will open between 157 and 177 new or expanded stores.
       
    • Cops can shoot a suspect with a Taser in order to get a sample of DNA, a New York county judge ruled today. In what was the first case of its kind in the state and possibly the nation, a judge ruled that as long as the act was not done "maliciously, or to an excessive extent, or with resulting injury" police can use stun guns to zap suspects who refuse to provide DNA samples.