Scenes From the Front Line of Food Safety

A beagle and a lot of patience are key to keeping the U.S. food supply safe.

11 photos
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Meet Hudson, the beagle who is trained to sniff out food and plants at Dulles International Airport. He's looking for invasive insects, plants, fungus and other pests that could hitch a ride into the U.S.
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Hudson works the lines of people coming into the U.S. through Dulles International Airport.
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Jennifer Jones is the canine officer with U.S. Customs and Border Protection who accompanies Hudson everywhere he goes, and follows up with his finds.
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"We go where his nose takes us," customs officer Jennifer Jones said of Hudson, the dog who looks for food and plants in luggage at Dulles International Airport. Imports must be declared, be legal and be screened carefully to prevent invasive plants and pests from entering the country.
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Imports -- like these bananas -- must be declared, be legal and be screened carefully to prevent invasive plants and pests from entering the country.
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Hudson gets a treat after doing his job well.
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Another part of the line of defense: Hand-searching imports at the Port of Baltimore.
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Border and customs officials had to search through the grains of this shipment of cumin.
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The customs officers found onion weed, an invasive plant that can hurt the U.S. farming and cattle industry, in this batch of cumin seed. The entire shipment was quarantined and later destroyed.
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The hated Emerald Ash Borer likely entered the US in wood packing material. It has now decimated millions of ash trees in Maryland, Virginia and 21 other states.
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Hudson, back on the job of finding food and plants at Dulles International Airport.
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