Rhee Makes Cover of Time Magazine

Chancellor profile shows Rhee's harder edge

NECN_081516_carolinebodycam_4pm_1200x675_744692291846.jpg
Robyn Twomey/Time Magazine

If you were one of the thousands who made their way through an airport this weekend en route back to the District after Thanksgiving, you were probably greeted at a magazine stand by a familiar face -- Michelle Rhee.

The feisty and tactical D.C. Schools chancellor is on the cover of the latest edition of Time Magazine

She's in a classroom with a stoic look on her face and holding a straw broom.

Inside the magazine is an article that portrays Rhee as a no-nonsense, matter-of-fact administrator who doesn't appear to be giving in to anyone associated with D.C. public schools. 

Nor does she seem to be making many friends, either.

The following is an excerpt from the article:

Rhee is, as a rule, far nicer to students than to most adults. In many private encounters with officials, bureaucrats and even fundraisers--who have committed millions of dollars to help her reform the schools--she doesn't smile or nod or do any of the things most people do to put others at ease. She reads her BlackBerry when people talk to her. I have seen her walk out of small meetings held for her benefit without a word of explanation. She says things most superintendents would not. "The thing that kills me about education is that it's so touchy-feely," she tells me one afternoon in her office. Then she raises her chin and does what I come to recognize as her standard imitation of people she doesn't respect. Sometimes she uses this voice to imitate teachers; other times, politicians or parents. Never students. "People say, 'Well, you know, test scores don't take into account creativity and the love of learning,'" she says with a drippy, grating voice, lowering her eyelids halfway. Then she snaps back to herself. "I'm like, 'You know what? I don't give a crap.' Don't get me wrong. Creativity is good and whatever. But if the children don't know how to read, I don't care how creative you are. You're not doing your job."

To read the entire article, click here:

Contact Us