Hanami After Dark: 150 Pounds of Sushi, Just for Starters

Sunday night's Hanami After Dark featured eats from sushi chefs of D.C., New York and Boston; local and Japanese art... and the traditional ritual of Maguro Kaitai, the breaking down of a 150-pound tuna.

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Miranda Smyre
As part of the Cherry Blossom Festival, Sunday night's Hanami After Dark featured eats from sushi chefs of D.C., New York and Boston; local and Japanese art... and the traditional ritual of Maguro Kaitai, the breaking down of a 150-pound tuna.
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Miranda Smyre
The first slice of the Maguro Kaitai, a traditional Japanese ritual of breaking down a 150 pound tuna.
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Miranda Smyre
In sync! Three chefs prepare fresh made-to-order sushi for hungry attendees.
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Miranda Smyre
Good sushi has no bones! Gotta make sure that cutting is precise.
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Miranda Smyre
Mountains of sushi for hungry, awaiting attendees.
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Miranda Smyre
"AKIKO" by Dominick Domingo (oil on canvas) was one of the many paintings on display at the reception. The night also included sake, wine, shochu, hors d'oerves from chefs from along the eastern seaboard.
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Miranda Smyre
Iichiko Shucho, Japan's #1-selling spirit, is made from barley and distilled water. Smooth and refreshing, it's considered to have neutral tones and a soft, clear taste.
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Miranda Smyre
Iichiko pairs well with sushi and any other Japanese dishes. Good thing there was plenty of them Sunday night!
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Miranda Smyre
Hanami After Dark -- which also includes an art auction -- benefits Tomodachi, an initiative led by U.S.-Japan military that provides humanitarian relief in the aftermath of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake.
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