'America's Got Talent' Finalist Brian King Joseph Attributes DC Roots to His Success - NBC4 Washington

'America's Got Talent' Finalist Brian King Joseph Attributes DC Roots to His Success

DC native Brian King Joseph, an electric violinist, is one performance away from winning it all on 'America's Got Talent'

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    'America's Got Talent' Finalist Attributes DC Roots to His Success

    Electric violinist Brian King Joseph is just one performance away from winning "America's Got Talent," but the self-taught musician got his start here in Washington, D.C. (Published Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2018)

    What to Know

    • Nicknamed the "king of violin" for his talents, Brian King Joseph grew up all around the D.C. area.

    • Joseph started his journey at the Chinatown Metro station, playing for Washington Capitals fans after games.

    • Joseph's first performance was at the Atlas Performing Arts Center on H Street, he said.

    Electric violinist Brian King Joseph is just one performance away from winning "America's Got Talent," but the self-taught musician got his start here in Washington, D.C.

    Joseph started his journey at the Chinatown Metro station, playing for Washington Capitals fans after games.

    "I love D.C. It has shaped me to come out here," Joseph said.

    Nicknamed the "king of violin" for his talents, Joseph grew up all around the D.C. area, moving between Northeast D.C., Silver Spring and Bethesda.

    Joseph attributes much of his success to the support he receives from the people of D.C.

    "The community of D.C. accepted, and honestly, fed me over those years. Literally putting food in my mouth, putting money in my case," the musician said. 

    Joseph said his first performance was at the Atlas Performing Arts Center on H Street. He even played for Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

    "D.C. always has the most special place in my heart," he said. "I owe D.C. everything."

    Joseph said he has plans to start a charity if he wins the talent show's $1 million prize. He wants to give kids who can’t afford music school or lessons an opportunity to find their passion. 

    "These kids shouldn't be forgotten," Joseph said.