Arctic Blast Brings Coldest Air of the Season | NBC4 Washington

Arctic Blast Brings Coldest Air of the Season

Storm Team4 says there are a few chances for snow in the coming days

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    NEWSLETTERS

    Storm Team4's Chief Meteorologist Doug Kammerer says we are in for a mix of cold, wintry weather in the coming days. (Published Friday, Dec. 9, 2016)

    Bundle up! The first arctic blast of the season will leave D.C. shivering for the next few days.

    Arctic air moved into the region Thursday night, bringing the coldest air since February.

    On Saturday, temperatures reached 39 degrees -- the coldest high temperature since Feb. 15, when the area was blanketed in 2 to 4 inches of snow, according to Storm Team4's Chuck Bell. Temperatures will dip into the 20s overnight Saturday.

    Friday felt about 30 degrees colder than Thursday, with wind chills across the D.C. area in the teens and 20s. Storm Team4 declared Friday a Weather Alert Day because of the blustery weather.

    The cold weather will continue into the weekend, but you won't have to worry about rain or snow. Lake effect snow is staying closer to Pennsylvania than here.

    The arctic air is expected to start to loosen its grip Sunday. Storm Team4’s Doug Kammerer said he expects Sunday will be a touch warmer than Saturday, so pick your tree and get holiday decorating done then.

    By Monday, highs in the region will be around 50 degrees with a chance of rain.

    But the slight relief from the cold won't last.

    Storm Team4 says a second, perhaps even colder, freeze could arrive late next week. A shift in a weather system known as the Polar Vortex may be partially to blame, according to The Weather Channel.

    Storm Team4 says there are several chances for snow next week, mainly on Wednesday and again next Saturday.

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    The temperature will reach the low 30s by the end of next week.

    "It's going to be a shock," said Kevin Roth, senior meteorologist at The Weather Channel.