Dodgeball Comes to the 'Burbs - NBC4 Washington

Dodgeball Comes to the 'Burbs

Adults are joining leagues

    processing...

    NEWSLETTERS

    Dodgeball Comes to the 'Burbs
    Getty Images
    SILVER SPRING, MD - JULY 17: Wearing a "target" T-shirt Nam Le displays a welt he developed after a previous game during a game of 'Dodgeball' at a tennis court July 17 in Silver Spring, MD. The sport is played on a tennis court with two teams divided by the net. The object is to hit your opponent with the ball without it being caught. Once all the players on one team are out the game is over. (Photo by Micah Walter/Getty Images)

    Looking to recapture part of your childhood?

    Then head over to Frederick, Md., and join the latest dodgeball league.

    Dodgeball has been making a huge comeback across the nation following the 2004 movie "Dodgeball: A True Underdog Story."
    On most weekends, you will find dodgeball games taking place on The National Mall in Washington, D.C. 
    So Frederick decided to join the fun with a new co-ed dodgeball program. The league is for locals 21 and older to participate in recreational sports. 
    Mike Libber helped organize the league and he's confident that there are enough people in Frederick interested in the game for it to catch on. "We know it might be small in the beginning, but in two years, it could (grow by) four times," he said.
    It started in January and will run for eight weeks of round robin play, followed by divisional playoffs. So far, 37 players have signed up for the program, which is part of City Adult Sport and Social League.The group is made up of 18 women and 19 men, aged from 21 to 51.
    One of the players to join the league told the Frederick News-Post she joined for a simple reason. "We wanted something to do in the winter," said Julie Manz.
    The games are being held in the William R. Talley Recreation Center's second-floor gym, on the basketball courts, which also meet dodgeball court standards.
    But the league is not using the rubber balls most programs use. They've substituted colorful 6-inch foam balls instead.