National Archives Shares Seldom Seem Civil War Artifacts

National Archives recognizes sesquicentennial with "Discovering the Civil War"

By Jim Handly
|  Wednesday, Apr 28, 2010  |  Updated 4:10 PM EDT
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National Archives Shares Seldom Seem Civil War Artifacts

U.S. National Archives and Records

When the U.S. Congress instituted a draft in 1863, many men sought to avoid Army service. The US Navy, which relied on volunteers for manpower, used this broadside to convince possible recruits that service in the Navy could be much more financially rewarding than Army pay.

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Civil war enthusiasts are in for a rare treat at the National Archives.

Beginning Friday, the public will get to experience “Discovering the Civil War,” an exhibit that includes seldom seen documents and little known stories from deep within its vaults.

Filmmaker Ken Burns was on hand Tuesday to help open the doors on the most extensive Civil War exhibit the Archives has ever put together. It marks the commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the war.
 
Visitors will see the original Virginia ordinance of secession and the pension records for a woman who served in the Union Army disguised as a man.
 
As an added bonus, the original Emancipation Proclamation will be on display for three days in November.

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